Prairie Flower

Prairie Flower

Perhaps as a five-part radio serial Prairie Flower might provide some particular interest to crime enthusiasts, but as a two-hour monologue in the Upstairs at the Gatehouse, even with a fifteen-minute interval, it progresses somewhat tediously… 

About Leo

About Leo

About Leo is the first offering in The Rebels Season at Jermyn Street Theatre; an autumn programme that focuses on ‘people who dared to be different’. It fits the bill perfectly and is quite simply a delightful play beautifully performed… 

Losing Venice

Losing Venice

Shakespeare created ‘the vastly fields of France’ in a cramped ‘cockpit’ and crammed within his ‘wooden O the very casques that did affright the air at Agincourt’ all courtesy of his audience’s imagination… 

Nests

Nests

Within a cluttered clearing in some woods that's neither town nor countryside and so somehow feels like nowhere, an unnamed Man (David McKay) sleeps the sleep of the just-finished-a-bottle-of-gut-rot-cider… 

Blood Wedding

Blood Wedding

Some productions are enhanced when a director changes the contexts of a play. Loncraine’s Richard III set in Nazi Germany; Hytner’s Henry V transposed to the time of the Iraq war; Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo and Juliet set in corporate New York; but Lorca in London? It’s true that one of the major themes in Blood Wedding is the individual’s fight against the Andalucían Catholic rural culture of the 1930s which suppressed freedom; but in George Richmond-Scott’s re-imagining of the play Spanish migrants in London and beyond – with the inevitable and lamentable struggles migrants may have – offer very little to connect it to the characters in Lorca’s Blood Wedding... 

Abi

Abi

Despite its title, we know very little of what actually happened at Abigail’s party. In real life, if it had turned into a crime scene, detectives would no doubt have had questions for Laurence and Tony, who both left their own party to check up on what was going on in their neighbour’s house... 

Abigail's Party

Abigail's Party

It’s a mark of how well a play is rooted in a particular era that the mere mention of Estée Lauder’s Youth Dew perfume can send ripples of mirth throughout the auditorium to an elderly generation that knowingly nudged each other and in many cases passed comment... 

The Yellow on the Broom

The Yellow on the Broom

It's just four years since Pitlochry Festival Theatre put on a production of Anne Downie's 1989 play The Yellow On The Broom, based on the autobiographical novel by Betsy Whyte about Scotland's Travellers in the 1930s... 

Tobacco Road

Tobacco Road

Tobacco Road is, more than anything, a lot of fun to watch and a strong example of the power of devised theatre and the ensemble. Incognito Theatre, the creators of the sell-out All Quiet On The Western Front, return to the Fringe with the story of a group of young Londoners seeking to climb to the top of their city's underworld in the 1920s... 

The Importance of Being Earnest as Performed by Three F*cking Queens and a Duck

The Importance of Being Earnest as Performed by Three F*cking Queens and a Duck

Melbourne’s Out Cast Theatre company, using ‘bits of Mr Oscar Wilde’, as stated on the flyer, return a sort-of version of The Importance of Being Earnest to the Edinburgh Fringe... 

Crucible

Crucible

Something pungent was bubbling away on the cauldron, centre stage, when I took my seat on the grassy knoll last night. Evocative smells and rosemary branches seductively strewn over the BOAT (Brighton Open Air Theatre) seating areas added to an eerie atmosphere... 

Vivarium

Vivarium

As anyone who’s been to an Edinburgh Festival Fringe can attest, word of mouth is crucial to a show’s success. There’s a reason Vivarium has been hot on the lips of many this year... 

Our Man in Havana

Our Man in Havana

The widely acclaimed ex-Young Pleasance physical theatre ensemble Spies Like Us returned to the Festival Fringe this year with not only one show but two brilliant shows in an adaptation of Büchner’s Woyzeck and the return of their award winning debut Our Man in Havana, based on Graham Greene’s iconic novel... 

Ken

Ken

Terry Johnson’s deeply personal Ken enjoyed a geographically personal run in as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, where much of the play takes place. The play is a deeply affectionate reminiscence of the playwright-performer’s friendship with the infamous theatre legend Ken Campbell... 

In Loyal Company

In Loyal Company

If you were anywhere near the Pleasance Courtyard this year, you’ll of heard of Lab Rats Theatre’s In Loyal Company as it shook the Fringe with its sell out run and critical acclaim... 

Daniel Cook: Carpet

Daniel Cook: Carpet

Watching Daniel Cook run wildly around Pleasance’s Bunker Two, three things are clear: 1. He’s really, really funny; 2. He knows who he is as a performer; and 3. He really likes his sky blue trainers... 

Year Without Summer

Year Without Summer

Cast Iron Theatre have rocked a minimalist set – an intimate three chairs and floor space surrounded by a ring of audience members – and have stretched it expertly to the peak of its credibility... 

Woke

Woke

After a superb sold-out run in 2017, Apphia Campbell returned to this year's Edinburgh Fringe for one week only. Woke is her powerful show portraying parallel narratives of two womens' civil rights awakenings... 

Rahul Kohli: All My Heroes Are Dead, in Jail or Touched Up Your Gran

Rahul Kohli: All My Heroes Are Dead, in Jail or Touched Up Your Gran

Rahul Kohli was unperturbed by the small audience on the evening this reviewer attended, likening it to ‘a Theresa May cabinet meeting’. He then delves into the provocative title of the show, explaining that in the following hour, he won’t provide any answers to society’s questions – instead, he will leave us with more questions... 

One Woman Alien

One Woman Alien

Heather-Rose Andrews skilfully acts out this minimalist stage version of cult classic Alien. In the heady depths of the Grassmarket, this parody of a Hollywood blockbuster is the backdrop for Andrews to explore some key questions we all have about the original... 

Michelle McManus: Reloaded

Michelle McManus: Reloaded

Michelle McManus has become a household name around these parts, and what she delivers is neither groundbreaking nor surprising – but it is still an hour deserving high acclaim. As we wait for McManus to greet us with her trademark glamour, we are treated to an on screen viewing of the moment she won Pop Idol in 2003... 

Jo Caulfield: Killing Time

Jo Caulfield: Killing Time

Jo Caulfield strides on stage with all the self-assuredness of the seasoned performer that she is. Wryly observing the audience, she comments that we ‘look holidayish – last night dressed up more’, and this sets the scene for some gentle audience interaction where Caulfield pointed out some 'silver foxes' and 'peaky wankers’... 

Adulting

Adulting

Hot from winning Adelaide Fringe Best Cabaret Weekly Award 2018, Tash York tempts us with this scintillating hour of song and expertly woven vignettes based on the concept of Adulting... 

UNCONDITIONAL

UNCONDITIONAL

There’s a lot going on in the world at the moment, isn’t there? So many stories needing to be told, so many national myths being rewritten, so much is constantly changing that any attempt to make a coherent artistic response feels futile... 

Paradiso

Paradiso

Our Theatre’s Paradiso is ostensibly a puppetry show about three men of different nationalities, reflecting on the last days of their lives before moving onto paradise. Unfortunately, in actuality it is a difficult to understand play about two old men leering at a woman, trying to intimidate a new arrival they see as a threat, and then being waved through to paradise by an angel who takes their vices off them first... 

Karaoke Saved My Life

Karaoke Saved My Life

All month I have spotted Scott Swinton, star of Karaoke Saved My Life, on the streets of Edinburgh, flyering for his show. He’s hard to miss in his starry black suit – like a disco themed Steve Martin, he generates smiles wherever he goes... 

John-Luke Roberts: Terrible Wonderful Adaptations

John-Luke Roberts: Terrible Wonderful Adaptations

As a reviewer I'm fortunate enough to get free tickets to many shows. As it was the last Friday night of the Fringe I thought I'd invite some friends along to see John-Luke Roberts: Terrible Wonderful Adaptations... 

It Is a Truth...

It Is a Truth...

When it comes to empowerment, Jaleelah Galbraith believes today’s feminists should look to Sense and Sensibility instead of Single Ladies. In her debut stand-up show It Is A Truth, Galbraith covers speed dating, school girl crushes and Bridget Jones to explain how Austen’s comments on life for women still ring true today... 

Haggis, Neeps and Burns

Haggis, Neeps and Burns

Haggis, Neeps and Burns is about as Scottish as tartan and the trinity. Sit down for a delicious plate of Haggis, Neeps and Tatties while listening to the well-sung poetry of Burns... 

Finding Fassbender

Finding Fassbender

The Fringe is all about first impressions; the opening minutes of a free stand up show, the six word spiel spurted at you by flyerers with an outstretched hand, the carefully chosen pose for the poster that will adorn Edinburgh’s walls for a month... 

Paul Williams: Santa Fe

Paul Williams: Santa Fe

The jig is up! Paul Williams is a quadruple threat – song, dance, comedy and opinion. The self proclaimed “most opinionated comedian in New Zealand” does it all in his show Santa Fe... 

Picasso's Women

Picasso's Women

Given how many inhabited his life, Picasso’s Women is but a mere glimpse from one side of the bed into what they endured. The great artist once observed, ‘There are two types of women - goddesses and doormats’... 

Losing My Mindfulness

Losing My Mindfulness

Losing My Mindfulness offers an amusing and uncomfortable send-up of the self-help nation we have become. Alongside an array of ‘Improve Your Life’ books, Katie McLeod plays an HR representative running a workshop for her colleagues on staying positive under stress... 

Thor and Loki

Thor and Loki

Thor and Loki is a wildly silly parody adaptation of the Ragnarok myth that is heaps of fun – even if it does go on a bit. If you came here for Marvel-style men with rippling muscles and male power fantasies you will be disappointed – unless you are into older gentleman then you have Odin, dressed in boxing gear... 

The Forecast

The Forecast

I’ll start by being honest – it is incredibly difficult to do sci-fi at the Fringe. The ability to use props and set dressing to create a world is limited when your budget is next to zero and you’re working out of a closed-down church... 

Por Favor

Por Favor

Set against the backdrop of a school production of West Side Story, this is the story of Mr Taylor, a teacher in charge of putting on the production. It also features Jodie, a troubled pupil at the school, who nevertheless turns out to be the most naturally gifted actress that Mr Taylor (Jeff) has ever worked with... 

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare is an easy sell at the Fringe, namely his comedies, and this production of Much Ado is no exception. It is fundamentally inoffensive- the aesthetic is strong, the acting is competent and capable, and the script is cut in a way that makes it feel quick, but not threadbare... 

Liz

Liz

There is no denying the writers’ talent; both Louis Pattison and Harry Style have created a highly enjoyable script and score rich in farcical humour and lighthearted silliness, but in a theatrical world so bent towards the revision, reclamation and reimagining of historical narratives (Hamilton, SiX and Something Rotten all being examples), their talents seemed to be misdirected, and one has to wonder why this particular subject matter was chosen in the first place... 

James Dean Is Dead! (Long Live James Dean)

James Dean Is Dead! (Long Live James Dean)

Springing up from the wreckage of his famous car (a Spider), James Dean talks honestly, candidly and sometimes with discomfort about his life. He makes no apologies as he discusses his childhood, issues with his father and the death of his mother when he was a mere nine years old... 

In Your Own Sweet Way

In Your Own Sweet Way

Hoghead Theatre Company Returns to the Fringe with their devised piece In Your Own Sweet Way. It's performed by six actors who playing six friends in search of a play.Soon they will all be heading off to university or taking other paths... 

I Am Orestes and I Am Electra Too

I Am Orestes and I Am Electra Too

The far future. After 25 years in Spain, Orestes (played by writer and co-director Arif Alfaraz) arrives as a psychoanalyst at a Greek asylum to treat his long-lost sister Electra’s (Marta Ramonet) ‘madness’ that he believes has been misdiagnosed... 

Great British Mysteries: 1599?

Great British Mysteries: 1599?

After a sell out run last year the Great British Mysteries return to the Fringe with a new show set 400 years earlier, but still the containing the wit, charm, and ridiculous sense of silliness that make it more than a worthy successor to the groups earlier stellar work... 

From Today Everything Changes

From Today Everything Changes

Before Chris’s wife died, she made him promise to be himself. She had known he was gay before he did, but things were different ‘in those days’ and you stayed together. Newly widowed and embracing ‘from today everything changes’, he begins online dating, not really believing he has anything to offer – especially to men younger than his own pensionable age... 

Frank Foucault: Shoes

Frank Foucault: Shoes

On the second floor of The Caves, in an arched, brick room with streamers cascading down either side, stands Frank. He wears a Mr. Bean-synonymous suit and a pained facial expression... 

Beep

Beep

Beginning in a frightening dystopia with five people wearing surgical masks manhandling one other as the audience enters, then as the show starts transforming to a happy young party student crowd is a little unsettling... 

BEASTS: Best of BEASTS

BEASTS: Best of BEASTS

Best of BEASTS is a wild and brilliant explosion of a show packed with slightly smaller explosions throughout – and I’m not talking about pyrotechnics. Owen Roberts, James McNicholas and Ciarán Dowd are just as high-octane and fired up as ever – so if you were worrying about them running out of fuel, don’t... 

A Generous Lover

A Generous Lover

A Generous Lover is La JohnJoseph’s heartfelt account of caring for a bipolar partner. Orpheus and La JohnJoseph pass through various institutional limbos including health services, art therapy seminars and medication focused recovery plans... 

Twonkey’s Night Train to Liechtenstein

Twonkey’s Night Train to Liechtenstein

Reviewing Mr. Twonkey at the Fringe has become a bit of an emotional rollercoaster. Every year, I’m excited to go see his new show and then, during the performance, I find myself thinking, “How the hell am I going to review this in a way that makes sense?” This year is no exception... 

The Other Guys: Reigning Men

The Other Guys: Reigning Men

The Other Guys are an all-male all-student a cappella ensemble from St Andrews, with a balanced programme of medleys, mashups and straight songs, as well as plenty of dad dancing, dad jokes and awkward chat... 

The End of Eddy

The End of Eddy

The End of Eddy is a heartfelt, autobiographical play based on the book En Finir avec Eddy Bellegueule by Édouard Louis, in which the author shares experiences of his difficult youth growing up in a working class family in a village in Northern France and his struggle coming to terms with his sexuality... 

Stuart Bowden: Our Molecules

Stuart Bowden: Our Molecules

Stuart Bowden has been doing this for a long time. Since his 2011 breakout collaboration with the now-legendary Doctor Brown, Dr Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown and His Singing Tiger, he has consistently produced odd little pieces of theatre that combine comedy, music, storytelling and clowning... 

Signals

Signals

There are shades of Beckett but without the plodding pretentiousness in Signals, Footprint Theatre’s new show all about human connection and the search for life beyond Earth. Two unnamed scientists (refreshingly played by two women, Eve Cowley and Immie Davies) are on the night shift, poring over piles of data and endlessly waiting for a reply to all the messages humanity has thrown out into the cosmos... 

Shakespeare Catalysts

Shakespeare Catalysts

Before I begin this review, I would like to clarify, as James Beagon (co-director and actor) did at the start of the show, that Aulos Productions’ Shakespeare Catalysts is a work in progress... 

Robin Clyfan: The Sea Is Big Enough to Take It

Robin Clyfan: The Sea Is Big Enough to Take It

At the centre of its big, warm heart, The Sea Is Big Enough to Take It is a story about a non-activist boy and his activist mother, and by extension a story about all of us and our relationships with our parents... 

Quines

Quines

When joining Gerda Stevenson for a performance of extracts from her poetry book Quines, you might be expecting an afternoon of her simply reading her excellent poetry. In fact, Stevenson weaves together singing, music, history, guest-performance and poetry together into a stellar show... 

Mat Ricardo vs the World

Mat Ricardo vs the World

When you’re considered the best at what you do, some of us might rest on our laurels but Mat Ricardo wants (indeed, needs) new challenges. So, he invited the world (via the open forum of Twitter) to set him the task of learning ten new tricks in one year which he would then perform at the Fringe... 

How to Be a Bad Girl

How to Be a Bad Girl

Like a piano player in brothel or a chanteuse at an orgy, Sabrina Chap is the fallen woman of cabaret. A classically-trained pianist who slipped into the world of burlesque and bawdy songs, Chap has bags of personality and cheeky twinkle that entices the audience in this small, hot space to lean in and let her take control... 

Grace

Grace

Katie Reddin-Clancy’s solo show has the potential to be fantastic – with a delicious, sharply observed script that is slickly performed. It is a show that appropriately evades simple labels, a mix of character comedy, cabaret, variety, new writing, monologues, solo-show and theatre, all wrapped into one... 

Dandy Darkly's All Aboard!

Dandy Darkly's All Aboard!

When you step into the venue for Dandy Darkly’s All Aboard, you don’t expect much. You see a man in drag standing in front of a veil of Halloween cutouts with a microphone in front of him, desperately trying to get your attention... 

Bad Luck

Bad Luck

Billed as part cabaret, part wannabe warehouse rave, my expectations were prepared. An industrial soundtrack heralds Black’s arrival on stage, as she opens with a perceptive and political spoken word/rap piece... 

A Hero of Our Time

A Hero of Our Time

Pechorin is a superfluous man. He has it all, yet seemingly has nothing. He's witty, smart and sensitive, yet also utterly manipulative and verging on sociopathic. He's the selfish, bored protagonist of Mikhail Lermontov's Russian classic A Hero Of Our Time, played with ferocity and bravery by the endlessly watchable Oliver Bennett... 

Alan Bennett's Say Something Happened

Alan Bennett's Say Something Happened

Alan Bennett is a national treasure, and his writings are justly well respected. Say Something Happened was originally broadcast on BBC television in 1982, and this production manages to capture the feel of the 1970’s incredibly well... 

Myra Dubois: We Wish You a Myra Christmas

Myra Dubois: We Wish You a Myra Christmas

It has often been said that Myra DuBois is an act way ahead of her time. Ok, well I’m not sure if that’s strictly true, but it does provide a thinly disguised opening gambit for this review and at the very least doing a Christmas show in August is forward thinking... 

Earnest & Wilde: Let's Face the Music (and Franz)

Earnest & Wilde: Let's Face the Music (and Franz)

Here is something special and unusual: the life and death of Franz Ferdinand, Archduke and heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, remixed into a cabaret history lecture by two talented musicians... 

Atomic 3001

Atomic 3001

At least three times over the course of Atomic 3001 I found myself contemplating whether choreographer and performer Leslie Mannès was somehow creating the techno beat that her body was reacting to... 

3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle

3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle

This is an intensely personal, sometimes funny, sometimes uncomfortable window into the relationship of two sisters at the toughest point of their lives so far. Alexandra and Kate Donnachie play themselves in this piece which as they say is written by Alex and Kate but mostly by Alex... 

1984

1984

It is frightening how Orwell’s nightmarish dystopia continues to ring true, year after year. From Winston’s colleague Syme (Liam McKinnes) exclaiming delightedly ‘It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words’, to the proletariat being described as subhuman, those who go against the Party as a stain to be wiped out, even Winston’s desire to sexually violate Julia before murdering her... 

Zoe Lyons: Entry Level Human

Zoe Lyons: Entry Level Human

Zoe Lyons delivers exactly what we have come to expect from her – an hour of fast paced observational humour that’s extremely relatable. Entry Level Human is a slick and polished hour exploring human anomalies – picnic goers who leave detritus on the beach, ‘destroying what they want to enjoy’ and people who listen to music on the bus without headphones... 

Johannes Dullin: Come Along and Bring a Friend!

Johannes Dullin: Come Along and Bring a Friend!

The back room at Dragonfly is unassuming. Rows of chairs extend backwards from an archway through which the performers do their thing. Yesterday I saw a man transform that room into a magical, ridiculous, confusing, joyful space... 

Jamali Maddix: Vape Lord

Jamali Maddix: Vape Lord

"If there are any reviewers in tonight, gimme four stars. Nah I'm only joking, it's a three star show." To be honest that's what I thought for much of the hour... 

Ivy Paige: Seduction

Ivy Paige: Seduction

Ivy Paige opens her show gliding on stage in full sequins and crystals, elegantly poised as the heady beats of It’s Raining Men blasts in the background. She injects energy with her mere presence, and welcomes us as her lovers past, present and future – because ‘pronouns all sound the same when you have a ball gag in your mouth’... 

Drip

Drip

I can’t imagine that anybody has nostalgia for life in their early teen years. You’re an awkward bundle of nerves so tightly wound that you can’t make a smart decision if you try, and even when you do, you can barely look someone in the eye to acknowledge them... 

Barry Ferns: Barry Loves You

Barry Ferns: Barry Loves You

Barry promised he would "share [his] soul with you" at the start of the show, and golly, he really does. In an hour that takes us from South African robots to family revelations, via flapping meat bags and biscuit addiction, Ferns presents an always engaging, sometimes profound stand-up show... 

The House

The House

A blissfully domestic sitting room in a nameless American suburb is the setting for Brian Parks’ riotous comedy The House. We open as two couples arrive fresh from their lawyer’s offices following the completion of the sale of the house from one couple to the other... 

Nowt as Queer as Folk

Nowt as Queer as Folk

Set in rural England, this pale ale drenched parable explores village life juxtaposed with urban sprawl. Topical issues of sexual impropriety, love lost, love rediscovered and fiddling finances are interspersed with song and slapstick scenes... 

Little Death Club

Little Death Club

An atmosphere of fun and weimar cabaret beats envelop us as we enter Beauty at the Circus Hub. Setting the scene for what’s ahead, various performers are preparing for their upcoming performances – a mime perfecting his make up; an acrobat performing myofascial release; and Bernie Dieter weaving through the audience, casting a spell over us as she introduces herself to each person arriving... 

Lines

Lines

With damning questions on moral and personal boundaries, Lines is a stunning and complex portrayal of sexual assault. Rora is violently raped after a night out with friends and two weeks pass before she can bear to discuss the crime with her family... 

Like a Sturgeon

Like a Sturgeon

Edinburgh-raised drag queen Ripley makes his Fringe debut this year with Like A Sturgeon. This is a perfect drag homage to some of the world’s leading females in politics. The show is perfectly lip-synced to an array of popular music, as well as Ripley’s own original lyrics... 

Kill the Beast: Director's Cut

Kill the Beast: Director's Cut

Acclaimed comedy troupe Kill the Beast returns to the Fringe with a new show that is a bizarre mash up of Poltergeist and The Room. The performance is at times hysterical, even if it isn’t always able to hit the mark... 

Job-Cher

Job-Cher

Two struggling Cher impersonators are disrobed and disheartened in Job-Cher. Waiting in their dressing room between costume changes, Sandra and Donna stare at the empty diary and wonder how on earth to revitalise their tired double act... 

Holy Sh*t

Holy Sh*t

Hearing a couple of priests swearing will always be amusing. Hearing a couple of priests swearing whilst digging up the body of a dead parishioner so they can sell the corpse to raise money for the church takes the humour to a whole new level... 

Bowjangles: Excalibow

Bowjangles: Excalibow

Excalibow features a String quartet consisting of Mitch McGugan (first violin), Ollie Izod (violin), Bertie Anderson (viola), and Ezme Gaze ('cello) who are all talented musicians on their respective instruments and they’ve got a lot more to offer than Pachelbel’s Canon... 

Body Shop

Body Shop

Body Shop is a multiplayer, multi-layered human body action game, a future-forward competition where women are assembled according to the stories of their bodies. The stories focus on five main body sections: the hair, eyes, breasts, womb and vagina... 

Grace Notes

Grace Notes

Becky Williams delivers an emotionally charged monologue about murderess Grace Miller somewhat reluctantly seeking a second chance at series of rehab sessions entitled Notes. She mocks the facilitator – the “Otter” as she calls her and the painfully awkward motivational language that cling to these schemes... 

The Katet Plays Stevie Wonder

The Katet Plays Stevie Wonder

When The Jazz Bar springs to mind, it is impossible not to think of the late legend Bill Kyle. The former owner and resident drummer, sadly taken in 2016, left a legacy in bands that still frequent his bar, and therein lies the true spirit of immortalisation... 

Viva Las Vegans

Viva Las Vegans

'Is it a good idea to link together a group of comedians for a Fringe show based purely on the common thread of dietary choice?' I asked my husband as we took a stroll along George Street to our Fringe venue... 

Umbrella Man

Umbrella Man

In a bar in Cambodia, a young Scottish tour guide is telling stories to travellers. There is a note of grief in his voice, hidden behind sarcasm that is concealed by a grimacing smile... 

Working Class Hero

Working Class Hero

Working Class Hero’s biggest flaw is that it isn’t about anything. It involves issues but mentions very little about their impact, and even if it did, our main characters are just insufficiently developed or interesting to make me care... 

The Fun Club Presents...

The Fun Club Presents...

I’m not sure how to explain The Fun Club Presents… Three performers – Sara Page, Franny Anne Rafferty and Alistair McPhail – in a room, all in animal face-paint, talk obliquely about themselves... 

The Archive of Educated Hearts

The Archive of Educated Hearts

"People are amazing, aren’t they?" So asks a lone voice in the darkness. It is, of course a rhetorical question: The Archive of Educated Hearts is a tiny gem, far away from the hysterical melee of the Fringe... 

Status

Status

Chris Thorpe's solo show for this year is about grappling with national identity as a white british man. It uses a mix of storytelling music, song, wonderful visuals and projection, to tell us the story of struggling with your national identity when your nation does something you fundamentally disagree with... 

Stand and Deliver

Stand and Deliver

There is something sad about leaving Stand and Deliver, accompanied by the sound of the Adam Ant song referenced in the title of the show. Tobacco Tea Theatre’s piece never really rises above the laziness that the use of this song suggests on behalf of the creative team, but then, it doesn’t appear to try to do so... 

Sitting by Katherine Parkinson

Sitting by Katherine Parkinson

Sitting, the debut play by comic actor Katherine Parkinson (The IT Crowd, Humans), explores the lives of three characters who are sitting for portraits. Through a series of dramatic monologues addressed to the artist offstage, we gradually discover these characters’ stories and what has brought them to be painted... 

Other People’s Teeth

Other People’s Teeth

Other Peoples Teeth is a unique, visceral and violent vignette, exploring the emotional depths of brutality. The performance opens with a Tarantino-esque scene, featuring two contract killers in a stand-off where only one person can survive... 

No Kids

No Kids

Should we have kids? It’s a difficult question, but one that becomes even more complex when you’re a gay couple, and have to grapple with a whole cavalcade of unique problems completely unknown to a straight couple... 

Harpy

Harpy

Harpy is an intricate portrayal of a nuisance neighbour, with more nuances than one would expect to squeeze into a one hour show. Su Pollard excels in her primary role of ‘Birdie’, also inhabiting various other characters to extend the cast... 

Closed Doors

Closed Doors

When the cast of Closed Doors were taking their bow, they mentioned that this show existed as a book and as an album, and I immediately wished I had listened to the album. Not because I was floored by the show’s brilliance, but because Closed Doors felt like an album and a poem retrofitted for the stage... 

Yummy

Yummy

Yummy is what it says on the tin – a gooey, delicious, and extremely well-crafted sequence of performances from an ensemble of drag queens who are masters of their respective crafts... 

Ivo Graham: Motion Sickness

Ivo Graham: Motion Sickness

Everyone’s favourite ‘virgin until the tender age of twenty one’ stand-up is back. Ivo Graham has a new flat, a looming marriage and a whole host of new self-aware gags. But, luckily for us, he’s just as charming and hilarious as we remember... 

Róisín and Chiara: Back to Back

Róisín and Chiara: Back to Back

Our eyes locked. I opened my mouth in anticipation. A pink shrimp sweet came sailing through the air and bounced off my lip. "My fault, totally my fault!" said Chiara Goldsmith, as she scurried cheekily off in her white boiler suit and oversized sunglasses...