Wyrd Sisters

An am-dram production in a church hall, this show comes from another world entirely to even the worst of fringe shows: a world where a serviceable witch’'s hat can be made from a cone of black paper and stick-on glitter; where people stand in horizontal lines, over-acting, pacing and delivering dialogue to the back of the hall; where smoke machines hiss and Mrs. Simpson from the WI plays the oboe: Stephen Berkoff this ain’'t.

Initially, it'’s all rather quaint. The company'’s enthusiasm and blissful ignorance of the rudiments of theatre (accidentally) conjure a Wodehousian idyll of tea with the vicar, dotty housewives and cake stalls. A soldier enters, wearing a plastic helmet and a home-made tabard covering jeans and t-shirt, and the thought occurs: are they taking the piss? Is this an inspired send-up of all things am-dram? An inner voice, like the itchy fibres of a noose around your neck, drones, “no, no, no. This is tragically sincere.

The story is adapted from Terry Pratchett’'s novel, and a few of his better lines have made it into the script, giving a few chuckles for some. But the adaptation leaves the story almost incomprehensible. Scene follows scene, new characters appear, an endless stream of performers litter the painfully drab stage, nothing amounts to anything.

The venue is a good mile from the centre of town. The play is billed as 90 minutes but drags on for 2 painful hours, adding insult to injury. Do not waste your money on this appalling play.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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The Blurb

'When shall we three meet again?' 'Well, I can do next Tuesday.' Terry Pratchett's witches are abroad on Discworld as the Kingdom of Lancre faces murder, treachery, corruption, torture and time travel. Inimitable comedy from the master.

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