Working On My Night Moves

At the Edinburgh Festival Fringe it can often feel very hard to be alone. At one of the busiest arts festivals in the world, there isn't much space to be alone with one's thoughts. Even during performances we are constantly grabbed and shook, the performers trying their best to make themselves stand out amongst the myriad shows audiences will see on any given day. What a relief, then, to see Working On My Night Moves. Wordlessly, without coersion or insistence, this show allows you to sit back and take in its art. Rarely do shows at the Fringe operate with such integrity and afford the audience such patience. It shows that with time invested, great things can happen.

Seeps into the audience's imagination and encourages a playfulness not seen anywhere else.

Working On My Night Moves is an abstract show discussing the ways in which women take up space in a public environment. That may not be immediately clear, though. For that matter, nothing about the show is immediately, or perhaps even ever, clear to some audience members. The beautiful thing about the show though is that that isn't important. Working On My Night Moves works exclusively in environmental awareness. We watch as two theatre technicians intricately, silently rearrange theatre equipment to create stunning tableaus. It is, for once in the most hectic month of the year, peaceful. At the same time it is haunting, alienating, funny, odd and even thrilling, but most importantly it gives the audience time to think and consider the puzzle pieces being arranged. Almost meditative, it seeps into the audience's imagination and encourages a playfulness not seen anywhere else at the Fringe.

Working in tandem with the silent yet hugely expressive performances of Julia Croft and Nisha Madhan, this performance succeeds due to some truly phenomenal sound design. Created by Te Aihe Butler (and featuring original compositions by Jason Wright), the way the sound seemingly comes from one small source while echoing and eminating from every corner of the room elevates the show from stage magic to what feels like genuine enchantment. Whilst in Summerhall's Old Lab we are fully existing inside the world of these two theatre technicians and given space to play. There is occasionally a touch too much downtime between the 'performing' moments of the show as the performers set up their elaborate Rube Golbderg works of art and minds start to wander, but for the majority of the show we are kept with our eyes and our imaginations glued to the sight of chairs dangling, dresses spinning and tinfoil fluttering. For anyone who wants to get away from the assault upon the senses that is the Edinburgh Fringe, this is the place to go.

Reviews by Charlie Ralph

The Stand Comedy Club

Josie Long: Tender

★★★★
Pleasance Dome

MARA

★★★★
Summerhall

Working On My Night Moves

★★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

The Rebirth of Meadow Rain

★★★★
Underbelly, Cowgate

Tokyo Rose

★★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Lucy McCormick: Post Popular

★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Breaking the rules, the patriarchy and the time/space continuum. A search for multiple feminist futurisms while reaching for outer space. A gesture to the impossible. An ode to the search for utopia. A science fiction/science fact/fantasy futurisms/dubstep mashup. Or just some moves in the night. Working on My Night Moves is the latest live art work by award-winning artists Julia Croft and Nisha Madhan, some of the brains behind previous Fringe hits Power Ballad (2017) and If There's Not Dancing at the Revolution, I'm Not Coming (2016).

Most Popular See More

The Book of Mormon

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £31.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Les Miserables

From £22.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mary Poppins

From £31.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £31.00

More Info

Find Tickets