Why We Make Mistakes

If you are yet to travel down to the Hendrick's Carnival of Knowledge, I encourage you to. Upon arrival, one discovers a surrealist salon, offering oddball events such as Victorian paper collage classes lead by impeccably-dressed representatives sporting waistcoats and bowler hats to boot. In the parlour bar, generously garnished cocktails are mixed to the sound of prohibition era tunes tumbling out of the music box.

At the sound of the gong, we are invited upstairs away from this gay frivolity to partake in more intellectual matters. 'Why We Make Mistakes' is a talk hosted by Yuka Igarashi of Granta magazine - a quarterly showcasing the best of new writing. As an Assistant Editor, Yuka is well-positioned to discuss those textual mistakes that our minds actively ignore, and the discussion includes a number of activities to demonstrate these theories.

As well as mistakes in writing we look into optical illusions and lapses in concentration, explored using short stories of gentleman pickpocket Apollo Robbins. The arrangement is relaxed and discussion stimulating; with the audience sat upon comfortable chairs around a number of little tables, smaller conversations are encouraged by organic division into smaller groups. Tongues are loosened even further by our complimentary Hendrick’s gin and tonics.

Like most of the events at Hendrick’s Carnival of Knowledge, the main focus falls upon the literary, and Yuka tells us of the incredible lengths she goes to in order to circumvent her biologically-hardwired autocorrect. We have a chance to try our own hand at editing too, as she shares with us the very piece she was given to edit in her interview for Granta. It might sound dull, but the sheer number of mistakes, plus their diversity of style, were pretty astonishing.

Not only were we given an engaging talk on the peculiarities of the human mind, but an enormous appreciation for the skill behind editing: a highly enjoyable and potentially valuable experience.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
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Performances

The Blurb

Discover how your brain really works and why we make mistakes when it comes to writing with Granta Assistant Editor and grammar nerd Yuka Igarashi. Tickets include one delightful cocktail.

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