What All The Rabbits Are Doing

Even by the standards of the Fringe, the Zoo has long since been established for pushing the boundaries of modern theatre and displaying provocative, no-holds-barred action in their intimate setting where nothing is hidden from the audience. This Zoe Hinks creation is no exception, with convicted rapist Raymond and nude model Marianna becoming entrapped in a world that ultimately will not let them go.

The plot is intriguing, cleverly shifting between the passionate and fervent dialogue of the trapped couple to the scientists and snipers surveying their every move, ready to pounce if the prisoner attempts to pounce. Battle lines become clearly drawn, with Marianna admitting “they’re going to get us” if either tries to escape.

Yet for a script which is packed with intrigue and emotion, it raises a few questions that the acting cannot answer. Not least why Marianna, portrayed so confidently and defiantly on stage, is doing the job that she is doing, or quite why she seems to be far more seduced by psychopath Raymond then he is by her.

While Raymond comes across as slightly too articulate, too intelligent and too reserved for the maniac that he is, the bitterness felt by both central characters to their oppressors is remarkably felt. The injustice at their eventual deaths at the hands of the corrupt snipers is also well received by the audience, who are certainly powerfully engaged by the storyline being played out in front of them. But there is a slight meekness about the plot, which takes the gloss of a sensitively handled play.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Convicted rapist Raymond undertakes life drawing for a government rehabilitation scheme. Scientists observe his nude model reaching for his salvation. 'A Clockwork Orange' meets 'Romeo and Juliet'. 'It made my year!' (Ken Campbell). www.sabotagetheatre.com

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