We This Way

A shamelessly monotonous cycle of intrigue, We This Way casts Seth Kiebel in a haunting light, his deadpan but deft delivery commanding an hour of interactive, communal ‘point-and-click’ adventure. We direct proceedings by waving an old-school glowstick corresponding to either an orange or blue light, signalling one of two decisions, though you can’t rule out being overridden by the majority. We travel through suitcase portals and on nauseatingly rickety trains, using only the soloist’s storytelling to guide us.

Aside from the affectionate ‘boings’ and the occasionally transportative power of sparkling scenery, this experience feels predominately like a test of endurance.

There were noticeable chuckles as the narrative looped round, but these only signposted this show’s divisiveness. It’s justifiably repetitive, in spite of the surprising jumps of scale and perspective. The bare-bones staging (two Anglepoise-style lamps and a nondescript desk) prove that the art is in the conjuring of the tale. But a question remains over whether an audience can put up with the boredom to reach the philosophical meta-theatrical enlightenment Kiebel proffers.

Somewhat lazily-inserted mythological elements compound the concern over this performance’s overzealous expansiveness. The core promise of interactivity is lost towards the end, and is also never engaged fully: when Kiebel describes ‘flickering fluorescent lights’ one feels that glowsticks could provide the perfect audience-driven, dynamic visualisation. Each spectator vote requires a split-second hand count which gets a little fatiguing – presumably more so for Kiebel.

Movement and action are what We This Way lacks, surprising given the initial promise of group exploration and discussion. Aside from the affectionate ‘boings’ and the occasionally transportative power of sparkling scenery, this experience feels predominately like a test of endurance.

Reviews by Jake A Ellamen

Greenside @ Royal Terrace

Perceptual Landscape

★★★★
Assembly George Square Studios

Jamie MacDonald: Oblivious

★★★★
Assembly George Square Theatre

Siro-A

★★★
Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Lee Miller and Picasso

★★★★
C venues - C

Pippin

★★
Pleasance Courtyard

The Falcon's Malteser by Anthony Horowitz

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Choose your own path through an imagined world… or perhaps your neighbour will choose for you. Without leaving your seat, you – or most of you, anyway – can go wherever you want. If not, don’t worry. Life is full of second chances. Explore a new interactive performance from the creator of The Unbuilt Room. Commissioned by and developed at Battersea Arts Centre. ‘Kriebel’s words are powerful, conjuring rooms without you even leaving your seat... This game is absorbing, enlightening and often funny’ (Londonist on The Unbuilt Room). www.wethisway.com

Most Popular See More

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Constellations

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets