Vinegar Knickers: On The Edge

If Vinegar Knickers really were underwear you’d want to wear them proudly on the outside of your trousers for all to see. Returning to Edinburgh for the third time with the winning combination of Samantha Baines, Katie Burnetts and Harriet Fisher, Vinegar Knickers are confidently daring and terribly funny. With the ability to transform your face into a grin for the rest of the day, they really should be high up your Fringe to-do list.

This talented trio offer a fresh new voice to sketch comedy, dealing with modern issues such as Oxbridge interviews and the inanity of blogging in song form. The show opens with an especially high-energy firecracker: a witty dissection of social class complete with a hoover and rapping. There are topical moments too, but mainly the sketches are deliciously surreal and absurd. Each new scenario is delightfully unexpected, and it’s all linked together by seamless running commentary and the compulsion that they must maintain being edgy.

Vinegar Knickers don’t appear to be afraid of any topic. They power through Hitler, cat faeces and conjoined twins with charm, and they channel the contention of this material with their unfalteringly confident performances and intelligent script. Sketches which in the hands of others could become offensive, are delivered both tastefully and effectively. For example, a skit involving a white, Jewish girl portraying a Jamaican toilet assistant with no costume but an afro wig and stereotypical accent was belly laughingly funny due to the excellence of Burnetts’ physical comedy.

At times sketches are interrupted in a self-conscious review of what’s going on, which is well executed for the most part. However, after a while it becomes frustrating that more of the scenes don’t run to completion and instead resort to a, ‘Harriet, what are you doing?’ kind of ‘off-stage’ moment. Saying that, this really is one slightly pulled seam in a still very wonderful pair of knickers.

Go and see Vinegar Knickers for some truly different and daring laughs, they are a female tour-de-force and should not be missed.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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The Blurb

Imagine it's 2012. Jews have ASBOs. English aristocracy blog. White-trash sing opera. Who are Vinegar Knickers? Dunno. But this sh*t just got edgy. 'A female powerhouse' (Stylist Magazine). 'What's not to like here?' (LeCool.com).

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