Villain

In a darkly comic, brutally honest and extremely current piece of new writing, Martin Murphy depicts the life of one woman who is striving to make a difference in the world. This is a one-woman show which starts at the end and works its way back to the beginning, twisting and turning as it portrays the life of a woman who graduates with a degree in fashion and attempts to make a life for herself on the busy streets of London.

An honest portrayal of life in modern society, when any mistake you make could go viral in a matter of minutes

Maddie Rice is a capable actor, sure of herself and her performance, moving with purpose and guiding the audience through the life of Rachel, who moves from a job as a phone insurance saleswoman to a career in social work. We can understand Rachel’s thought processes and see her as a realistic character, who has made mistakes, gotten too drunk and been late for appointments (haven’t we all).

Though Rice stumbles over her lines at times, she has the ability to regain herself quickly and thoroughly. She injects just enough humour into the piece, never going over the top. She is both engaging and captivating, entertaining the audience throughout. From the onset, the difference between Rachel as a young woman and the haggard, wanted woman she becomes is clearly portrayed.

The media play a central role in this piece, as we see the life of this young social worker unravel as her face is splashed across the tabloids. Bruised Sky Productions, with this play, have succeeded in creating an honest portrayal of life in modern society, when any mistake you make could go viral in a matter of minutes.

Overall, this is a successful depiction of life in London, which an audience can clearly relate to. It calls into question the role of the media in our lives, and also how much we can trust what we watch read or hear. We are left asking ourselves what exactly makes a villain, and whether or not we could be next. 

Reviews by Angela O'Callaghan

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Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Performances

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The Blurb

Tired of her highly paid sales job, Rachel makes a move into social work only to find herself involved in a controversial case bringing her into the media's unforgiving gaze. Villain tells the story of a woman who wants to make a difference. A new one-woman show. Dark, topical and hilarious in places. Previous play Manor: 'powerful' (WhatsOnStage.com). 'Brutally beautiful' **** (RemoteGoat.com). 'Captivating dialogue' **** (SpoonFed.co.uk). 'Martin Murphy's writing is brutal, poetic and bloody funny. A play which deserves to be seen in the flesh' **** (David Scinto).

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