Truth

Slow Clap's Truth epitomises the power of independent comedy. Vachel Spirason and Stephanie Brotchie have a surreal and impressive show, written by the two of them and performed by the former. After their great success last year with The Hermitude of Angus, Ecstatic, Slow Clap are going from strength to strength and should definitely not be missed. Spirason gives every ounce of himself in this performance and it is impossible to drag your eyes away from the stage; it's not even worth blinking just in case you miss one of his witty asides. This show will make your belly ache from laughing, yet manages to combine its absurdity with moments of real pathos; it's abstract yet accessible, bizarre but brilliant.

Spirason announces early on that he is a storyteller and he launches with gusto into a yarn about a naked man he once came across in New Zealand and how he came to acquire a rather magical object. This in itself is hilarious; Spirason is bursting with flamboyant charm and has an exceptional presence on stage. As the story develops the audience is introduced to a number of individually ridiculous and wonderful characters. Each is very distinctive and has their own dance; we meet the flamenco dancing Juan who loves name-based wordplay, the cross-eyed Russian chess champion who tries to make everyone join in with his 'chessecise'-chess based exercise and a variety of others. It is remarkable with what ease Spirason moves between personalities, each as convincing as the last yet utterly unique. His command of different accents is extensive, but something all the characters share is his same unflinching confidence; he launches himself into the audience on various occasions and ecstatically stands over a member of the front row, gyrating right into their face.

There are twists and turns throughout the story; expect the unexpected and don't be surprised if you find your mouth hanging open aghast at the end. Spirason gives the performance of a lifetime; the success of Truth hangs on his immaculate timing and inexhaustible charisma. The energy output of this show could power a small nation; forget renewable energy, just hook your television up to Spirason. Go and see this show, it is truly original, intelligently written and showcases a powerful performance.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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The Blurb

From the multi award-winning creators of Angus, Ecstatic comes this odd collection of dancing characters all bound together by a true story. 'Delightfully weird, effervescent and deep, this high-voltage performance will entertain at every level' ***** (Adelaide Advertiser).

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