Track 3

Mad, rad, and dangerous to miss, Track 3 is a glorious treat that is sure to bring a smile to the face. Adapted from Chekhov’s comedy Three Sisters, Theatre Movement Bazaar and Greenwich Theatre distort the traditional naturalistic approach into a surreal mixture of dance, song and clowning. We follow the misfortunes of the Prozorov family as they struggle to find meaning in their bland, stagnant world: the sisters yearn for the sophistication and culture of Moscow, while their brother Andrei collapses under the weight of expectation heaved upon his shoulders.

Bland and stagnant, however, could not be further from the truth of this world. As far from naturalism as may be possible, the movements of the characters are sharp and choreographed, while speech is deliberately stilted and theatrical. Performers spontaneously burst into song and dance, and do some marvellous things with set rearrangement. What we have is not the oppressive boredom felt by the traditional characters but a correspondingly oppressive cabin fever. The seriously intense, hyper, anti-naturalistic approach is in equal parts hilarious and disturbing as we see this universe spiral into claustrophobic madness.

The work that has gone into blocking and choreography is staggering. The space is used to its fullest as the cast spring back and forth with the precision of Robin Hood’s arrows, pushing on a joyfully exhausting pace. Though all the performers bring buckets of energy, a true stand-out is Irina - the youngest sister - whose face is infinitely expressive and who delivers a pant-wettingly funny performance. Andrei, too, possesses fabulous timing, particularly in the nervous, naturalistic whimpers which punctuate the stylised dialogue.

As the show draws to a close a melancholy begins to pervade and encompass; the hyperactivity fades and we are left with a moving but somewhat warming conclusion. The closing scene of the original is truly sad; Track 3 offers slight yet significant hope for one final humourous diversion. The production is just as strong in its gloom as it is in its mania, and becomes rather upsetting at points.

The time whizzed by as swiftly as the pace and all too soon it was over. I would have loved to have stayed around for another hour of this incredible show. I may just have to go again.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

Chekhov’s Three Sisters is derailed from its Victorian origins with bold physicality, dance, song and humour. A 21st-century existential extravaganza. ‘Electrifying. You will regret it if you miss it’ (LACultureHound.blogspot.com). Outstanding Theatre Award (Anton's Uncles, 2011).

Most Popular See More

Mary Poppins

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £42.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets