The  Yellow Wallpaper

The Yellow Wallpaper is an adaptation of the short story by the same name. It depicts a woman in the late 1800s whose husband has removed her to the country for her to recover her health. Despite her protests she is encouraged to take exercise and rest and not to stimulate her mental faculties in the slightest. Confined to a room with wallpaper she detests, the woman slowly descends into a world of her own creation, defined by the wallpaper. The original story is written as a diary, so it seems fitting that the performance is told directly to the audience. Though it is never certain whether this is an abstract form of narration or a symbol of her mental instability, it nonetheless creates a level of intimacy between the heroine and the audience as she relates her everyday struggles.The development of the characters is subtle and delicate. The woman conveys her complex feelings towards her husband, both of love and of oppression. Through the powerful performance the audience experiences the fear she feels at the lack of control within her life. What is commendable is the presence this one-woman show brings to the stage. Though the space is small, and largely taken up by a bed, the blocking is dynamic and helps keep the energy up throughout.The show starts with a movie projection, perhaps to set the tone of the performance, but it was stopped prematurely. This left the audience slightly confused and added nothing to the performance. The music used to convey the passage of time became slightly irritating and, as the play progressed, too literal. However, the staging of the wallpaper is simple and effective, creating a physical presence but allowing the possibility that it is a mental creation.The play examines the meaning of a woman’s life - how she struggles with the duties of a wife and mother, is unable to fulfill either. Though it perhaps fails to capture the true horror of the original, it is an impressive piece of theatre.

Reviews by Nicole Adam

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

A woman is taken to the country for fresh air and bed rest. With no company and forbidden to read or write, the room becomes her world and her only companion, the wallpaper.

Most Popular See More

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets