The Worst Little Warehouse in London

The Worst Little Warehouse In London is crammed into The Box, which appears to be an actual shipping crate housed in Assembly Gardens. Such a location could not be more appropriate a place to house Lala Barlow and Robbie Smith, the real life couple that tell the audience the story of their first year in London and the roommates they lived with in a manner that packs a lot of weight onto their shoulders.

A perfect afternoon treat at the Fringe.

They leap from character to character and throw themselves from song to song in a manner that is exhausting to watch, let alone perform. Whilst the show occasionally falters with moments that feel out of place and feels occasionally a little childish for a cabaret that also features a song about being a pornstar, the overarching, if slightly inconsistent, tone is one of love and warmth which creates a thoroughly enjoyable and entertaining hour.

Placed in the cabaret section of the Fringe guide, one may expect to be enlisted to play any number of characters in Lala and Robbie's cabaret, but thankfully The Worst Little Warehouse In London refrains itself entirely from audience interaction which ends up making the production very refreshing and a relief to cabaret fans who hate becoming part of the show. Instead the audience is free here to sit back and enjoy some playful songs and endearing banter between the two performers.

The Worst Little Warehouse In London is imperfect but endlessly charming and while it would most likely wilt in the spotlights of a primetime slot it works as a perfect afternoon treat at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Whilst the show occasionally feels thrown together from a few disparate elements, including a completely egregious but admittedly great cover of The Cranberries' classic Dreams, the show is a little slice of cabaret delight that takes the attention off the cheap thrills of audience interaction and instead places it squarely on two talented, likeable performers.

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

When 12 people live in a converted warehouse in north London, what could possibly go wrong? In this hilarious and off-the-wall cabaret, Lala Barlow and Robbie Smith are two wide-eyed koalas fresh off the boat and looking for the perfect place to call home. Relive their year living at Daisy Mill as they discover high ceilings, bathroom baskets and very thin bedroom walls. Directed by Sarah Redmond and starring every housemate you've ever lived with, it's a celebration of the joys of shared housing.

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