The Technique of Getting By

Moors Bar theatre is new to me and I can’t say much for the venue other than its pretty cool to get to walk through the pre-set props to get to the loo (on the side of the stage). Unfortunately, I can’t say much for this devised piece by Radi-Dah theatre either, which is a shame because I wanted to like this young company of recent graduates from Plymouth University and their examination of ‘getting by’ in London as new Theatre graduates. I guess what I was hoping for was a hint at the universal challenges of getting by, some wit about the specific skills that a Theatre degree lands you with, and possibly some hope to come away with.

A painfully obvious poem about not wanting pregnant women to take your seat on the tube and a drawn-out skit of an uninterested tour guide, complete with achingly stereotyped tourists of different nationalities are particular low points.

However, the tropes start flowing fast: dads taking pictures in the front row; the company’s entrance crawling whilst playing a drama game involving a ‘ball of energy’; the classic student tropes of shouting over each other (to imply heightened tension); white-face make-up with over-sized smiles (to designate ‘character’); pinning used props to a washing line at the back of the stage (which I think is supposed to be meaningful); and the seemingly random bits of dancing and gurning. The whole thing smacks of school drama. This becomes increasingly frustrating alongside a narrative which is essentially a long complaint about having to get proper jobs and pay rent.

There’s a couple of promising scenes - an internet dating skit which would have amused if it wasn’t for the aforementioned gurning, a pretty funny bit about CV skillsets. A pass-the-parcel game where each layer opened elicits a little moan about areas of London and their absurd house pricing would work if not for the amazing out-datedness of their descriptions; these kids think hipsters still live in Camden, it's still possible to rent in Chelsea, and that doing a cringe-inducingly bad Jamaican accent for the Brixton bit will convince us they’ve ever actually been there. A painfully obvious poem about not wanting pregnant women to take your seat on the tube and a drawn-out skit of an uninterested tour guide, complete with achingly stereotyped tourists of different nationalities are particular low points.

The denouement comes with the slow solemn removal of make-up to a backing track of a parental conversation about prospects and Aaron Latini delivering a grandiose speech questioning how talent is measured and asking ‘are we just deluded?’. I’m going to go with ‘no comment’. Despite the exceedingly poor show, I’m giving one star for effort, as the performers certainly throw their all into this odd piece, and one for the real streak of promise here - Louise Holdway’s instant likeability and natural flair for comic timing. 

Reviews by Jen Payne

Camden People's Theatre

We Are Not Cakes

★★
Camden People's Theatre

First Draft

★★
The Hen & Chickens Theatre

Dead in the Water - A Musical Tragicomedy

★★★★★
Camden People's Theatre

Where Do Little Birds Go?

★★★★
The Hen & Chickens Theatre

The Girl In The Blue Coat

★★★
Etcetera Theatre

The Fix

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Join us ‘Radi-dah Theatre Company’ in our debut show ‘The Technique of Getting By’. The show is a wonderfully absurd comic exploration on how having a theatre degree can get you through the day to day grind in the big smoke. Drawing upon experiences and techniques learnt whilst studying on a unique University course outside of London’s grasp.

Most Popular See More

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £12.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £39.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets