The Sorries

Douglas Kay and Martin Philip of The Sorries are likeable, witty, and talented performers, and they put on a great show here. As we take our seats in the steep raked audience at the Quaker Meeting House they enter playing Bodhrans (Celtic drums) and singing I Will Go – a stirring, earnest duet as they walk amongst the crowd. It sets the tone nicely. The Sorries specialise in old Scottish songs (at one point Kay jokes that Lads Among the Heather from the nineteenth century, is the most modern song in the set) and they work them artfully – picking their way around the old language of the lyrics and updating them where appropriate.

Fun and talented and if you haven’t heard these songs before then you should – you’re in Scotland.

The performance is just so fun and energetic, it’s impossible to not be drawn in. Philip keeps beat on Charlie is my Darling by stamping his foot, and the crowd is encouraged to help by clapping along. The result is a deletion of the space between performers and audience. Clapping and singing as we are, we feel as though we’re helping Kay and Philip – less being sung to, and more joining a grand old singalong: exactly what these songs were written for in the first place.

The two really are just charming – they tell jokes, they’re self-effacing and poke fun at each other between songs, and above all they make everyone feel welcome. Their voices merge well. Philip’s is the more powerful (‘lusty’, it might once have been called); Kay’s has this endearing throatiness, as if he’s been wounded, that is fully able to evoke the melancholy in these songs. An acoustic performance of Ae Fond Kiss is genuinely moving with that wavering on “Ae fond kiss and then we sever…”.

It’s interesting to think about the subject-matter of these old songs. It seemed every Scottish audience-member knew them all, knew the words, and there were murmurs of appreciation when the title of the next track was announced. Almost every song shares the same “Jacobite politics”, the same pride in Scottishness, which makes the jokes about Brexit and Scottish independence feel seamless and relevant to the Sorries’ music. The old fault lines remain beneath the surface.

Go and see The Sorries. You won’t be disappointed. They’re fun and talented and if you haven’t heard these songs before then you should – you’re in Scotland. If you have heard them before, then you won’t have heard them as good as this.

Reviews by Matthew Bradley

The Jazz Bar

The Great Hipster Songbook

★★★
Laughing Horse @ The Free Sisters

Mixtape

★★★★
The Jazz Bar

Nick Harper

★★★
Gilded Balloon at the Museum

The Beatbox Collective

★★★★
Quaker Meeting House

The Sorries

★★★★

Performances

Location

The Blurb

After seven successful runs with a host of sell-out shows, the kilted duo is back with more selections from the Scottish songbook. Inspired by a love of The Corries, Douglas Kay and Martin Philip sing, play and banter their way through an entertaining hour of traditional Scottish and comic songs. ‘Deliciously infectious… riotous fun’ ***** (ThreeWeeks). ‘Authentic, lively and hugely, hugely enjoyable’ ***** (BroadwayBaby.com). ‘A must for lovers of Scot songs’ **** (EdinburghSpotlight.com). ‘Genuinely funny' (FringeReport.com). 'Their... revision of Johnny Lad is entertainingly true to a noble, public figure swatting tradition' (Rob Adams, Herald).