The Shaman's Dream

In the gardens of the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art Two (formerly known as the Dean Gallery), a combined cast of Scottish performers and the Norwegian company Stella Polaris put on a visually impressive, if sometimes unfocused, show of acrobatics, fire juggling and mythical storytelling.

Locals will recognise much of the show from the annual Beltane Fire Festival:many of the mythical figures, like the Shaman, the three women and the numerous animal totems, will be recognisable as distant relatives of the Green Man, White Women, Red Men and so on, while ritualistic chanting and drumming is also a major fixture of both.

The actual narrative is similarly left open to interpretation and is largely centred around the performers entering and exiting the huge and pleasingly flexible performance area in a variety of impressively designed masks and outfits, although on a couple of occasions they seemed more to fill time while costume changes took place backstage.

Once the sun set fully and the main light source was the fire used by the performers, the show really came into its own with its display of synchronised fire spinning and fire breathing. Special mention should also go to the young man dressed as a fox who performed some pretty incredible acrobatics on the centre pole on the stage, which drew easily the biggest response from the audience of the night.

The Shaman’s Dream is an interesting and unique show, although the asking price might put some punters off. One word of advice if you do decide to make the trip: bring insect repellent. I cannot emphasise that enough.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Inspired by Nordic mythology, this is a ritual celebrating life, nature and history. Figurines on stilts, animal masks, large balls of fire and deep base drums stretch your imagination in all directions and create magical ritual settings.

Most Popular See More

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets