The Raymond & Mr Timpkins Revue

Golly.It’s a shame that this event turned as much of a damp squib as the weather. Few problems could be found with Ray and Mr. T themselves; hosts of the show and providers of situational interludes; this accomplished double act raising a titter or two with their musical clowning. However, the comedy provided by the three acts proved to be utterly lustreless.Shelagh Martin came across as an interesting character with some good ideas for gags. But she failed to establish the necessary intimacy with the audience for her comedy to work, so most of her jokes fell as flat as Norfolk, and were not broadly understood. Moreover, her delivery was a little rushed and vague, giving the listeners no clue as to whether they were listening to the beginning of an anecdote, or had just missed a punch line. Chris Luby, next up, certainly cut a dash with his military attire and moustache. Yet his impressions, however talented they doubtless were, made you feel as if you had stumbled across someone in the throes of shell shock. Luby called the audience to attention, but their mirth had most definitely gone AWOL. Finally Noel Britten, when his turn came, managed to drag the standard of the show up a wee bit. His appeal is most definitely that of embarrassing-prankster-Dad meets social-commentary punster. And this works quite well. Out of the bunch he was easily the funniest and ensured nobody made an early exit. He also found time to eat his own peeling skin, which may have been a gag, or a neurotic reaction to the whole, awkward affair. Top marks to him.Sorry Raymond and Mr. Timpkins, but I hope your Revue next week is worth the reviewing.

Since you’re here…

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Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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The Blurb

GOOD LORD! It's an hour of top quality (though some may say peculiar, frankly odd and not even slightly normal) 21st-century vaudevillian comedic turns.

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