The Questionnaire

What starts off promisingly as a suspenseful yarn about a man trapped by some odd psychiatric cult (which seems to resemble Scientology in more ways than comfortable), devolves to two actors yelling at each other about philosophy. Frankly, after all of that, it is impossible to care about anyone, and you’re just hoping that someone finally escapes so that you can too. For the first half of the piece, Jack is hounded by a disembodied voice needling him about filling out a secondary questionnaire, after an initial questionnaire where he ticked the box saying he’s ‘sad’ with his life.The progression over the next twenty minutes of the piece is circular at best, yet slightly compelling. When his initially faceless interrogator finally enters the space, his face contorted into an odd, cultish smile, the devolution of the piece spirals into chaos. Both performers continue to scream at each other, with little focus or intent. The performer playing Jack made the piece at least watchable, shifting from nervous to annoyed to angry very effectively. The nameless character, though, seemed far too concerned with making his fake smile seem as forced as humanly possible, making it a complete distraction. The scenario presented felt like the initial indoctrination period for a new recruit into a brainwashing cult. Had the energy been more focused and the text less circuital, The Questionnaire could have left the audience with more questions for themselves. As it stood, the only quandary I had was what to have for lunch.

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
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Acting For Others
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The Blurb

It seemed a straightforward questionnaire, but now Jack suspects his hosts are looking for more than a discussion. Ninth Life present this bizarre descent into a crisis of self. Jack is arrogant. Jack is alone.

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