The Girl Who Cannot Die

This carnivalesque exploration of the tale of Snow White was admirably committed in its aesthetic, with costumes, face paint  inventive use of props and live music all paying tribute to those travelling theatre companies that revelled in the grotesque and fantastical. I would go as far to say that The Girl Who Cannot Die was a visual feast, with poster-worthy imagery popping up in every scene – memorably the Godmother being consumed by a silver cloth and Snow White being ensnared in a ‘corset’. 

I would go as far to say that The Girl Who Cannot Die was a visual feast, with poster-worthy imagery popping up in every scene – memorably the Godmother being consumed by a silver cloth and Snow White being ensnared in a ‘corset’.

The strong elements of physical theatre and ensemble work were brilliantly effective in the subject matter, with cast members effortlessly levitating and contorting their bodies to convey plot points. Unfortunately, these gilded surface values of the piece couldn’t make up for the disappointing lack of original storytelling. Captivating aspects of the story were set up from the start – quite apart from the 'Girl Who Cannot Die', we had placards announcing ‘The Man with Two Brains’ and ‘The Clown’ – characters that were set up for an exciting entrance but never really materialised. The shady showman who saved Snow White and now exploits her death defying nature as a side-show ‘freak’ barely surfaced after the introduction, especially not in any particular relevance to the plot. Unfortunately, the show was less ‘Girl Who Cannot Die’ and more of an unoriginal retelling of a classical fairytale – something that popular culture is so saturated with currently that we just lose interest. 

Another example of a piece that was sparkling at conception but didn’t explore the full potential, the heady aesthetics of The Girl Who Cannot Die unfortunately weren’t enough to salvage an unnecessarily bland narrative.

Reviews by Corinne O'Sullivan

Sussex County Cricket Club

The Wedding Reception

★★★★
Brighton Spiegeltent: Bosco

The Girl Who Cannot Die

★★★
The Dukebox @ St Andrew's

Muscovado

★★★
The Dukebox Theatre

What's in the Punch?

★★★
Brighton Media Centre Studio

Brewers Fayre by David Greig

★★★★
Brighton Spiegeltent

Knee Deep

★★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Delve into the darkened underworld of the Circus. Physical theatre with puppetry and music in this comic and painfully tragic retelling of Snow White. But this is not a fairy-tale, and there will be no happy endings…

Most Popular See More

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Life of Pi

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Witness for the Prosecution

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Hairspray

From £22.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets