The Climate Fables

Describing itself as “a retelling of Rapunzel” for the climate age, Debating Extinction, the first of a double bill entitled Climate Fables, by Padraig Bond, contains several interesting ideas, though presented in a format which doesn’t always allow them to realise their full potential.

Showing the very human impact of an often abstract debate

Miranda and Susan are a mother/daughter pairing surviving on their own in a climate apocalypse. Whilst Miranda seeks to recultivate the earth’s nature and waits for permanent human extinction, Susan longs to escape to the remaining pockets of civilisation alongside her lover Teddy and their unborn child. A compelling emotional core, showing the very human impact of an often-abstract debate about our potential future, the show is at its best when this emotional core is allowed to sit, particularly with the dynamic of the hopeful Teddy and the slightly cautious Susan. However, it is undercut at times by unfitting attempts to introduce elements of mystery and the supernatural into a script which doesn’t need it to succeed.

Despite the small stage often making certain scenes feeling a bit cramped, the cast is able to clearly present the impact of a world ravaged by climate change. Kirsten Hoffman’s description of Miranda’s desire to bring back the colour of nature to a world rotted by climate change helps to sell the regret of what was lost, whilst Tibor Lazar’s Teddy presents a strong sense of hope with an interesting description of the world beyond the limited setting of the piece. Penelope Dean’s Susan sells her feelings towards Teddy and her mother well along with the difficulty of the decision she must make, whilst making the emotional impact of giving birth in a world left for dead abundantly clear.

Whilst the story at points becomes a little confused and some elements slow down the pace, the core is certainly strong. With a focus on human relationships, Torch Theatre brings to life not only the consequences of our actions on climate change, but the very human decisions those who are left to deal with our actions may have to make themselves.

Visit Show Website

Reviews by Ewan Woods

theSpace @ Niddry St

Crash and Burn

★★★★
Paradise in The Vault

Apple of My Eye

★★★★★
Greenside @ Nicolson Square

The Climate Fables

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Two truthful new plays about the future of humanity in Climate Change. Debating Extinction, a romance about a young climate refugee couple deciding whether to have children on an inhospitable planet. The Trash Garden, a comedy inverting Adam and Eve about the last two human beings on Earth. These stories will tackle your climate anxieties head on, and bring you relief, hope, and understanding of our situation in the process. Developed in New York by artists and environmental scientists, this work is ushering in a new stage of enlightenment about the existential truth of the climate crisis.

Most Popular See More

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £46.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £12.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £39.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets