The  Boy With Tape On His Face - More Tape

Before the curtain goes up on one of the most whispered about shows at the Fringe, The Boy with Tape on His Face looks at his already delighted audience with wide eyes and what must be a knowing smile behind that big black tape. They are already in the palm of his hand.

More Tape is the physical comedy maverick’s second venture after the knockout success that took him to the The Royal Variety Performance, BBC2’s Comedy Prom and BBC3’s Live at the Fringe. The show is devised from a mixture of mime, stand-up and drama, with absolutely no words and more than a touch of magic. Since movie style sets and special effects entered into the world of theatre, the stage has forgotten the power of the imagination; The Boy has it in abundance and by going back to basics, has pushed comedy beyond the limits of fancy tech.

Of course, there wouldn’t be a show at all if The Boy didn’t have someone to play with. He bounds through the fourth wall at break neck speed, blue eyes frantically searching for someone to join in the fun. It appears that a man of no words really is the definition of a charmer, or it could be that no one dare refuse his offer. For fear of ‘looking like a cock’, a severe warning given at the beginning of the show to those who don’t play along, victims slope off through the wall but always come back beaming.

The Boy is resounding proof that some things are better left unsaid. Besides, he doesn’t need to make any noise; it’s done for him by the audiences who fizz with delight from start to finish and by a media trying to make sense of the magic. When you see it, you won’t be able to keep quiet about it.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

The Blurb

Brand new show! As seen on The Royal Variety Performance, BBC2’s Comedy Prom and BBC3’s Live at the Fringe. ‘Spectacular! Hysterically funny – fight for a ticket!’ ***** (TimeOut).

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