The Big Bite-Size Breakfast Show

Don’t come for the breakfast. A wilted croissant, a cup of coffee and a handful of strawberries to be eaten without a plate in a dark auditorium do not make for a pleasant dining experience. But please, please do stay for the plays. They are more than worth the insult of the sad expatriate pastry flaking butter dandruff onto your lap.

A rotation of three ‘menus’ present a different set of short plays each day. Showcasing sharp new writing and wonderfully versatile performers, the set I saw (Menu 2) was the best start to the day since the invention of espresso. Five ten-minute pieces formed a balanced meal, including some gentle absurdism, a touching monologue, and a hilarious skit that could have been a highlight of any ‘Best Of’ Monty Python collection. The latter, ‘The Needle and the Damage Done’, was the most memorable piece from an excellent set. A stereotypical 1950’s domestic scene became a hilarious subversion of expectations with one twist following the other. ‘Hitched’ was another crowd-pleaser: on her wedding night, the bride’s zipper gets stuck and outrageous measures must be taken. It had just the right blend of smut and second-hand embarrassment, and the parents’ attempt at helping was pitch-perfect and oh-so-recognizable.

The addition of a thoughtful monologue about life on the tightrope - ‘Thin Air’ - provided a pause in the comedy and demonstrated some genuinely touching acting. Less successful was ‘Drury Lane’, which saw a pair of 18th century actors rehearsing their own lives. A tragicomedy with an interesting concept, it didn’t quite convince despite maintaining the high standard of acting on offer throughout. ‘Elephants and Coffee’ made the biggest beeline for the absurd; on her way to the therapist, a woman bumps into an elephant who looks for all the world like a man in a baggy grey suit. The maybe-elephant is loveable and weirdly believable and the sketch charms despite a slightly heavy-handed commentary on psychiatry and social ills. Yet any weak points are soon forgotten as you get stuck into a morning smorgasbord of witty writing. You will certainly come away feeling hungry for more.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

Fresh five-star breakfast occasion featuring three daily selections of sparkling international playlets. New works, fresh treatments of peoples' choice favourites plus coffee and croissants! Brighton Angel winners, Fringe First and Carol Tambor Award shortlists.

Most Popular See More

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets