The Americans

What five words first come to mind when you hear “The Americans”? This is what the award-winning American comedian, Jeff Kreisler, has been asking people on his travels. From his findings, he’s created a satirical comedy that ticks all the anti-Bush boxes, but fails to say anything truly political.

Meet Sam American. He is a Budweiser-drinking, flag-flying patriot struggling with the “war at home.” His wife, Libby, is a freedom-loving gal whose priorities include yoga, therapy and women’s liberation. Their daughter, America (or Mary for short), who wants to be a pop star and carries her purse-sized dog everywhere she goes, culminates her teenage rebellion by declaring her own country in the kitchen.

Kreisler, who also plays Sam, has crafted a laugh-out-loud script that touches on all the expected clichés. Scenes such as America’s refusal to grant Libby entry into her country will resonate with anyone who has ever applied for a US visa, and everyone must smile in recognition at the projected interludes showing members of British public expressing our oft-heard prejudices against the stars and stripes.

It may be easy to chuckle at such humour in the current political climate, but I was left wanting more. What are the true implications of such stereotypes? What does it say about those of us willing to laugh at them? While this performance has the potential to turn the ridicule around on its audience, to ask us to challenge our easy acceptance of anti-Americanism, in actuality it does little more than inform us that Americans too can laugh at Americans.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Gilded Balloon. 30th July – 25th August (not 11th). 15.00 (1h).

Most Popular See More

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mary Poppins

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

My Fair Lady

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets