The Absence Of

The relationship between parent and child is one of the most important in society and in the lives of most people. It defines, shapes us and can heavily determine the sort of people we become. This is the subject of the mature, entertaining and intriguing first show by Plexus Theatre Company. Using a combination of physical theatre, naturalistic scenes and heavily stylised movement, the group deftly examines the differing relationships we have with our parents.

The Absence Of is a superb debut show and definitely marks Plexus as a company to watch in the future.

The play is presented in a clinical manner, almost like a scientific study or academic presentation played out in front of us, piecing together evidence for its argument as the play progresses. What helps this is the incredibly talented young cast who are an ensemble in the best sense of the word. There’s no weak link in sight and each brings an enthusiasm and intensity to both the sections of physical theatre and acted scenes, holding the audience’s attention throughout. The play deals with some weighty topic such as abuse, neglect and abandonment, but these are all dealt with in a deft and measured fashion. It’s clear a lot of careful thought and effort went into this production and it shows in the slick, precise movement of the performers and the thoughtful examination of its subject matter.

This is a young company that is brimming with enthusiasm and energy, and it is a joy to see them at work. Indeed the end seems to come too soon, as the play seems to stop rather abruptly and this is certainly a show that could merit another 10 or 15 minutes to delve back into the rich subject matter at hand. However if my only main complaint is that I was left wanting more then we can take this as a sign of the show’s success. The Absence Of is a superb debut show and definitely marks Plexus as a company to watch in the future. I can only hope there’s more of the same to come.

Reviews by Joseph McAulay

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The Blurb

Do you feel there was anything missing between you and your parents? The Absence Of is the first piece of work created by eight BRIT School theatre students: Plexus Theatre Company. This work shows a new and sophisticated teenage opinion yet to be heard. The Absence Of explores the relationship between children and their parents and how the lack of something can have a direct effect on who we become. Combining testimonies of the public with physical theatre, The Absence Of allows the audience to have an insight into true, unspoken stories.

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