Sweetmeat

Sweetmeat is about the consented cannibalism between two men who are also lovers. It discusses the boundaries of love and pain. How far can the two be taken? Where is the line?

The show cleverly describes the sexual tension and the intimacy of pain and what makes people wish to inflict pain on others. Or have pain inflicted up on them.

The acting style is very minimalistic and at first it seemed too small, but as the dialogue got more and more intense it became utterly appropriate for the piece. The vocal delivery of the lines is intimate but fitting to the style. The sexual tension between the two characters is obvious from the beginning. And it just escalates throughout the piece (let’s just say it’s not one you would want to bring your children along to).

From the beginning of their relationship one can also not help but notice that something is off. They seem too comfortable with each other compared to how tense they are at the beginning. This too has a perfectly logical explanation. Or as logical as cannibalism can be.

The play is written in a clever way, slowly revealing each layer of the story until it is completely bare and honest at the end: similar to the style of a good crime novel. The production is accompanied by a video projection that is only visible to those who sit on the right hand side. Most of the projections seem unrelated to the performance, perhaps this is an artistic choice but they could easily be cut without damaging the production. The only projection that is justified is a beautiful monologue at the end, intimately filmed in a home video style. However one wonders if it could not be done in another way to make the show less complicated and cheaper to tour.

The show cleverly describes the sexual tension and the intimacy of pain and what makes people wish to inflict pain on others. Or have pain inflicted up on them. I would not recommend it to anyone sensitive to violence, but it is a fantastic production that will hopefully be toured further.

Reviews by Disa Andersen

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Sigmund unexpectedly loses his home and moves in with the enigmatic Christian. The two men discover shared dark cravings and dive head-first into a passionate relationship that worries those around them. But they don’t care. They want to be close. Closer. Bold and stylised but not dark or edgy. Shocking but never played for shock value. Inspired by the true story of consensual cannibal Armin Meiwes, Sweetmeat is a play about loneliness, romantic intensity, and the purity of love.

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