Stand Up Sat Down

St Andrews student Matt Gibson talks about life with Asian parents, being unable to seduce girls and those annoying things in life. Supported by friend Ollie Leonard, the pair are obviously out of their depth at the Edinburgh Fringe and are both awkward and struggling somewhat on stage.

Gibson nervously takes to the stage with all the enthusiasm of a wet mop. His inexperience definitely shows, as he seems to lack any comedic timing whatsoever. His line delivery and storytelling abilities desperately need some work as he in no way engages the audience but rather seems to talk at us in a monotone voice.

His set is very repetitive and he always seems to fall back on the fact that he’s Asian; there’s no originality here at all. Jokes about being able to do all his homework fall flat on the less than impressed audience. He includes some out-of-the-blue derogatory remarks about his girlfriend and his mother which border on being downright sexist. They in no way suit his sweet and rather innocent persona and so they scream of trying too hard, while lacking any sort of imagination or creativity.

The highlight of the show (if you can call it that) was the song at the end about everything that annoys him. From American teenagers to vegetarians, again, Gibson’s work is highly unoriginal and uninspired. This is not helped by very amateur keyboard playing and rather out of tune singing voice.

The problem with Matt Gibson’s show, more than anything, was that it was dull. Very dull. From its bored and lazy attitude to his clichéd and overused jokes, Gibson had nothing to offer.

Reviews by Emily Edwards

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Performances

The Blurb

Matt Gibson brings his own twist to stand-up comedy. Talking about Arabic, Asia and general alliteration. This show promises to make your sides split (not literally, that'd be highly dangerous and inconvenient for everyone involved).

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