Soweto Spiritual Singers: The Return

The Soweto Spiritual Singers are at the Fringe with two shows, this later one at the Assembly Rooms called The Return, is an uplifting and enjoyable hour of African spirituality.

The show and the ensemble really do shine, with each singer given the opportunity to show off their individual skills; the soloists impressing with both their range and ability to perform with such a large set of singers.

The South African singers and musicians put on a show that is full of energy and African culture. With a wide ranging song choice, from starting the show with a rendition of Our Father, to more traditional African music, the show is never boring.

The singers showcase the material that has made them famous, including the song they sang at the opening ceremony of the first football World Cup to be staged in Africa in 2010. The energetic choreography that comes with the music is also a great exhibition of their performing prowess.

Unfortunately, (and maybe I’m showing my own personal music taste too much here), the band that provided the background music to the exceptional singing too often sounded like something you might hear if you got lost in London and ended up in an elevator in the ‘60s. This lounge music sound detracted from the overall beauty and power of the singing and when stripped back to the absolute basics, the show improves immeasurably.

The show and the ensemble really do shine, with each singer given the opportunity to show off their individual skills; the soloists impressing with both their range and ability to perform with such a large set of singers.

Overall the show is enjoyable and the poignancy of the message behind the music; one of joy, acceptance and tolerance, really comes to the fore throughout. It’s a fantastic celebration of South Africa, its music and dance and is brilliantly uplifting.

Reviews by Conor Matchett

The Assembly Rooms

Soweto Spiritual Singers: The Return

★★★★
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Performances

Location

The Blurb

South African traditional a cappella gospel choir sing Zulu songs full of earthy rhythm, rich harmonies and spirit. An inspiration shout of joy, from those who have also been seen performing at the 2010 FIFA World Cup in Johannesburg to the cheers of billions of people around the globe. With their unique all singing, all dancing performances, the choir leave the audience completely captivated; breathless and often deeply moved. Fresh sounds, inspirational harmonies and fabulous dancing make this an irresistible must-see performance expressing the spirit of Africa.

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