Someone's Pinched Me Yoghurt!

Adam Broomfield-Strawn has a confident and cool energy about him and when he entered the small venue I had high hopes that this good energy would be reflected in his comedy. Unfortunately it did not.

He powered energetically through the wall of silence, but things sadly didn’t look up as the hour wore on.

Broomfield-Strawn bases his show around reminiscent anecdotes and stories about his parents, children and wife. He also attempts some observational humour about things such as play parks, the many stages of life and dating. Unfortunately however, the tales that he tells and observations he makes are a little mundane, sometimes crude and generally not very funny. There was sadly very little laughter, which is a shame because Broomfield-Strawn has the liveliness of a good comedian.

He reminded me a little of Lee Evans in his demeanour but in little else. It’s Broomfield-Strawn’s material that is lacking, but unfortunately for him strong material is pretty fundamental to a good comedy show. He referenced almost every kind of human excrement possible in his stories. He also uses a lot of poorly formulated and exaggerated similes which only weakens the jokes he is trying to make further. The conversation he made with his audience was awkward and often inappropriate, such as asking a father sitting next to his children about his sex life with his wife. This doesn’t make for pleasant listening for anyone, and I cringed an awful lot.

He powered energetically through the wall of silence, but things sadly didn’t look up as the hour wore on. Not only were the audience watching for the time to pass, but Broomfield-Strawn himself looked at his watch quite frequently, which is never a good sign. In addition, there was absolutely no mention of anything to do with yoghurt, which is puzzling given the name of the show and his flyers.

Reviews by Kayleigh Blair

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Someone's Pinched Me Yoghurt!

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The Blurb

National Entertainment Awards Regional winner and Foster's South Coast Comedian of the Year finalist, Adam Broomfield-Strawn, brings one man's observational ramblings of life as a father, husband, comedian and general strange fellow. Relatable to all and mostly harmless. A cross between Lee Evans and Billy Connolly but he sweats less and has better hair.

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