Snails and Ketchup

In Snails and Ketchup, Glasgow-based Singaporean Ramesh Meyyappan tells the dark tale of a dysfunctional family through solo mime. The plot is loosely based on Italo Calvino's The Baron in the Trees, in which a boy chooses an arboreal existence alone in the forest, living alongside the snails he has befriended, over the cruelty and heartache of his home environment. The story ends in tragedy, but along the way there are delightful, humorous and lighter moments aplenty.The set is cleverly designed with aerial ropes soon establishing themselves as the trees and vines through which Ramesh swings to the solace of his treetop perch. His highly physical storytelling style is rich in detail, but perhaps most impressive is his ability to embody caricatures to the extent that even as he plays out the mother’s twin birth, the audience are gasping along with him. He captures and communicates intricate emotions with precision and his physical state is always equally matched by powerful facial expression. The narrative, however, is underdeveloped and mostly unclear, and we rely heavily on the programme notes, distributed before the performance, to decipher the stage action.Though this is a well-paced work, the movement vocabulary is relatively limited and soon becomes repetitive. As we struggle to follow the flow of events, the piece seems to go round in circles, lacking a strong sense of direction and leaving us feeling somewhat distant. Narrative aside, the show is held together by Ramesh’s unbounded energy and absolute commitment to the tale.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Using imaginative physicality, an ingenious aerial set, animation and live score, the life of a young boy poignantly unfolds, from traumatic birth to a typical family dinner. A darkly comic tale of a dysfunctional family.

Most Popular See More

SIX

From £42.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets