Slut

Slut tells a story which is sadly the experience of many women; girls who have the benefit of naivety during their younger years, which is then destroyed when they face the reality of a misogynistic culture that prevents them from exploring their true identity.

Choreography is tight and does touch on those very important issues, but the lack of structure between each segment lets the show down.

This is the experience Slut recreates through Khatak dance, originating from the 16th century Mughal Empire which spanned most of India. The dance is constant and repetitive throughout the performance and while certain performers hold my attention very well, the discrepancies between the dancers and the individual acts do let down the overall quality.

The patriarchy and misogyny are very topical issues and many different acts at the Fringe include these issues and by no means should the importance of tackling the patriarchy be undermined; this show gives it a good stab and that should be rewarded. However, the tokenistic approach seems to belittle the overall premise of the show and at times there are very serious allusions to poignance such as the grieving of a mother but this takes place in the very corner of the stage so is overlooked by focus on a much less critical scene. There is very little natural flow between acts which detracts from the quality of the overall dancing.

Choreography is tight and does touch on those very important issues, but the lack of structure between each segment lets the show down. The use of the stage is disappointing and pivotal moments are often missed. This does not detract from the main dancer, who is slightly older than the rest of the cast and is mesmerising to watch while encapsulating many different characters. Sadly, the other performers do not reach the same quality. 

Reviews by Joshua Hepple

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

I saw him looking at me when I danced, I saw the look in his eyes, I knew what he wanted to call me… Slovenly, sexually liberated, promiscuous – these are just some of the labels given to women who do not fit into defined cultural mores and instead express individualism. These, along with issues of sexual grooming, stereotyping across race and cultural perceptions, are explored in this provocative new Kathak dance-theatre piece. Made in association with women’s groups from Birmingham, London and the south-east, Slut seeks to challenge the negative connotations of the term and reclaim the title!

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