slut (r)evolution (no one gets there overnight)

In this fun one-woman show, a self-described bi-dyke shares with us stories of her sexual evolution, from Mormon adolescent scanning second-hand books for smut, to monogamous domesticated lesbian, to kink camp attendee.

It’s basically like a really dirty Judy Blume novel. It’s frank and funny.

It feels confessional, much of it biographical, and Moore is very watchable. She’s at her best when she’s in conversation with us. Some of the flashback scenes felt a little too ‘acted’, largely because this is a small performance space.

The title suggests something provocative and potentially offensive, but happily this isn’t the case. Sure, there are some rude words, some graphic descriptions and some simulated sex, but none of this is done to shock or make the audience uncomfortable. More often than not, it’s to make us laugh.

Given the title of the show – and the content – I was surprised that Moore steered clear of talking about the word slut and the culture of slut-shaming. It’s true that she takes proud ownership in the word but stops short of actually reclaiming it in a positive way (a la Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues). Perhaps she doesn’t want to get into the politics of sex (she didn’t for religion and describes leaving the church because of selfish motivations, not a political standpoint) but it feels like a missed opportunity and would add another level to the show.

It’s basically like a really dirty Judy Blume novel. It’s frank and funny and while it didn’t completely rock my world, sex is subjective (as Moore points out) so your experience may be different. Might be worth a look.

Reviews by Emma Gibson

theSpace @ Venue45

Love and Information by Caryl Churchill

★★★★
C venues - C nova

Cartography

★★★
theSpace on the Mile

The Beanfield

★★★★
Pleasance Dome

The Hampstead Murder Mystery!

★★★★
theSpace on the Mile

Marching for Necie

★★
Paradise in The Vault

Women of the Mourning Fields

★★★★

Performances

Location

The Blurb

How did it feel? What the hell was she thinking? And how will it affect tonight’s hook-up? Memoir and manifesto come together in this incendiary exploration of sex, relationships, and salad crispers. Best of Fest, Winnipeg Fringe (2011). Best One (Wo)man Show, Houston Fringe (2014). ‘A study in vulnerability that manages to achieve catharsis and healing through a talented performance’ (MarbleVictoria.com). ‘Ms Moore is captivating to watch and has as much energy as a spring tornado. (Spectator, review of Phone Whore, 2014). Look also for Cameryn's Phone Whore and Smut Slam Cabaret!