Shappi Khorsandi: The Moon on a Stick

There were some brilliant one-liners in this show, and I’m tending to think that this is what Shappi Khorsandi really does best. Maybe more of her time should be spent delivering these. As it was, she spent the first few minutes interacting with members of the audience, which doesn’t appear to be her greatest strength.I’ve come across more than one magazine article since I came up here about what it must be like to be a comedian’s family, and the stresses of that as those close to the performer are used for material. Maybe it’s not actually the easiest choice for the comedian either – if it means that instead of leaving home and all its concerns behind when you close the door, they remain with you and in your head at work.A great deal of this show is – to all intents and purposes – taken up with things that have happened to Shappi in the past year. The break up of a marriage is inevitably devastating, and Shappi does hone in sharply on the way we tend to overlook - or even find charming -aspects of ‘the other’ that eventually seem unbearable. There are various references to her father, and one that worked particularly well was her taking words of his literally from her teens. There was also good material about managing a toddler, and, of course, political comedy – including the irony of how Shappi came not to play the part of an Iraqi nurse.Overall, I came to this show with high expectations based on earlier experiences, and perhaps I expected too much. For whatever reason, although this was a very good and shoulder-shaking show, it did not hang together as well as I had hoped.

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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The Blurb

Star of BBC Radio 4's 'Shappi Talk' and BBC1's 'Live at the Apollo' is back with a brand new show about wanting it all! 'On the brink of becoming a household name' (Evening Standard). www.offthekerb.co.uk

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