Scott Agnew: Pride (In The Name of Love)

Scott Agnew is a really nice guy who has a strong stage presence and has some very good lines.I really liked his early material about the power of Glaswegian swearing. The bus driver bit and the umlaut joke were very good. The problem is that the humour fades in the second half. Now, he did have a very difficult, dead audience the night I saw him – they just were not giving anything – but a strong comedian has to rise above that.The stories about a cross-cultural relationship where the boyfriend’s family causes disaster and about a boy friend on drugs were affecting, and after one a woman said she wanted to hug him – and meant it! But they do need to be interspersed with some humour to keep the audience alive. They were also rather ordinary stories – awful experiences for Scott, yes, but they do need to have individualising details and to be brought alive so that we can visualise them.It is very dangerous to take a dip into seriousness for the second half of a comedy show. You need first to get the audience really fired up and on your side. Despite some good material, this didn’t happen here. And then you need to have a mixture of laughter and tears later, not just honest to goodness describing of relationship problems.I was very much with Scott, but I could sense that the audience wanted more. I think Scott would do well to have a larger number of gags in his show and to mix up the serious and the rib-tickling, not just about splitting his show in half as he did here. Keep at it, mate, but have us rolling about laughing more.

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The Blurb

Critically acclaimed Glasgow stand-up explores what he and others have done for love and whether they should be proud of it. Winner of the Scottish Comedian of the Year 2008.

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