Sarah Kendall: A Day in October

A Day in October centres around Kendall’s teenage years at a rough high-school in Newcastle, Australia. Kendall at this point is far from the confident comedian we see before us; she has acne all across her face, her weird dreams have even her therapist befuddled and her main objective is to remain invisible. Someone who isn’t succeeding at this is George Peach, the resident loser who everyone on the school picks on. Her show then proceeds to focus on her developing friendship with George and how a certain day in October changed his life forever.

Hilarious and moving, with a killer ending, this is not a show to miss.

What is apparent from the get go of narrating part of her childhood is that Kendall is an expert story-teller. She makes a point that she prefers stories to real life, that with stories you can essentially play God, a role which she plays perfectly. Her story, which in other hands could be rushed in a 10 minute job, is expanded beautifully over an hour, allowing both the narrative of her story and her comedy to settle.

Her structure and pacing is also something to be admired. While the narrative creates the backbone of her show, Kendall will often go off on hilarious tangents, covering Dutch people’s level of English to the difference between Italian and Australian smokers. Yet despite going off on seemingly irrelevant tangents, often referring to running jokes, Kendall always reigns herself in, making the nucleus of her show shine through.

However the strength of Kendall’s show is that it is not only extremely funny but also incredibly poignant. Within seconds Kendall turns her audience from uncontrollable laughter to complete silence, making the show something quite special. Hilarious and moving, with a killer ending, this is not a show to miss.

Reviews by Will Roberts

The Assembly Rooms

Immigrant Diaries: Sajeela Kershi and Guests

★★★★
Laughing Horse @ The Newsroom

Sajeela Kershi: Shallow Halal

★★★★
Assembly George Square Studios

Chris Dugdale: Sleightly Dishonest

★★★
Just the Tonic at The Mash House

Ally Houston: Shandy

★★
The Assembly Rooms

Tom Stade: You’re Welcome!

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Having won the Comics' Choice Award at the Melbourne Comedy Festival, multi award-winning comedian Sarah Kendall is back with a hilarious new hour of storytelling. In this hour-long narrative, Sarah takes audiences back to a day in October 1990, when her best friend died for exactly 11 seconds. It’s a story about the remarkable effect those eleven seconds had on Sarah and her schoolmates. ‘Kendall is a thoroughly captivating teller of an expertly constructed story’ **** (Chortle.co.uk). ‘Kendall’s intensity keeps the audience gripped all the way’ **** (Fest). ‘Fiercely funny’ (Observer).

Most Popular See More

Come From Away

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Heathers The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Hairspray

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £13.00

More Info

Find Tickets