Riot

The word ‘riot’ has been on everyone’s lips the past few days. But this is a riot of a different kind, set safely on the stage and trust me, it’s worth witnessing. This production tells the story of a riot that occurred at an Ikea in February 2005 when 6,000 people queued up for 12 hours for their midnight sale. With double-bed frames at £30 and three-seater leather sofas for £45 people became animals, all for the sake of furniture.It is refreshing to see a such a production with so much originality. The cast wear the iconic yellow t-shirts and the set is made up, aptly, of Ikea lamps which are incorporated into their scenes and physical sections. The space is used inventively as there is lots of movement; the cast are completely confident and did not falter. They also provide their own music, playing their own instruments throughout; there is no doubt that they are a talented bunch producing a performance that well surpasses their ages.The script is hilarious too. It feels improvised at times, but the cast are more than capable of dealing with this and it is lovely to see them crack up from time to time, especially when James tries to ask out Nikki, which is squirmingly funny. Each character has their own personality and every cast member pulls their weight. The performance never lags and by the end the effort and energy invested by the cast is evident.This is a kooky and alternative production which is immense fun. I urge you to see it. I promise you won’t get hurt and it’s worth every penny.

Reviews by Coco Creme

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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The Blurb

Epic tale of violence and cheap sofas. The Wardrobe Ensemble constructs a lamp-lit flat-pack universe with more characters than you can throw a meatball at. Music and madness hammered together in a tragicomedy of solid Swedish design.

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