Rewind

This is how theatre should be.

If you see one show at the Fringe this year: make it this one

Difficult. Challenging. Delicate. Beautiful. Haunting. Leaving you with an ache that you cannot reconcile for minutes, hours, days after the event.

The stage is busy; nondescript white box shelves lining the back wall; trollies; instruments; microphones. As the piece progresses and every single item is utilised in a highly imaginative and deliberate way you start to appreciate the finesse of the company.

The opening introduction from Andres Velasquez is charming and informal; and we are led, with increasing intensity to the final, awful message of the play. One cannot help but contrast Velasquez’s face at the close of the piece to the beginning and ponder the death of his wide smile. Perhaps its own tribute to the gravity of the subject matter and the responsibility to those it seeks to honour; perhaps a reminder that full recovery from intimate knowledge of such events may never be possible.

Ephemeral Ensemble use testimonies of Latin American refugees and migrants who have suffered under authoritarian regimes to construct this evocative piece which continues to resonate with the audience long after we have left the theatre.

With little reliance on dialogue, and some extraordinary moments of physical theatre; we are guided through the awful reality of forensic archaeologists uncovering the remains of those who who have stood up against human rights abuses. The international company also comprises Eyglo Belafonte and Louise Wilcox who flow and mesh about the stage with an almost unbearable fusion of lightness of technique with weight of understanding.

Lighting designer Josephine Tremelling traverses the stage with the performers; creating effects with an interactive immediacy which suggests the very deliberate choices made by those in command. When water washes a portrait and is mingled with drops of blood, we are inevitably reminded that someone, somewhere made that decision to cut off the life of another.

Alex Paton’s stunning range of musical underscoring helps to drive the narrative and signpost our locations with exquisite precision; and illuminates one extraordinary puppetry scene which is easily one of the most dramatically articulate and emotionally redolent things I have ever seen on stage.

Director Ramon Ayres has created an immaculately wrought experience with care, love and respect evident in every moment. It is apt for a piece which seeks to sustain the legacy of those who have been silenced to continue resonating with the audience long after we have left the theatre... and this one is sure to prove difficult to forget.

It is not often that we get the chance to see a piece of theatre at once so utterly beautiful and deeply purposeful; and it is no exaggeration to suggest that watching this will leave a weighty impression on you heart. If you see one show at the Fringe this year; make it this one.

Visit Show Website

Reviews by Rebecca Vines

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Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Inspired by testimonies of Latin American refugees and migrants, internationally acclaimed Rewind remembers those who endured, and those who continue to live under authoritarianism. Through energetic physical theatre, compelling live music and vibrant visuals, Ephemeral Ensemble uncovers the timeless and universal struggle for social justice. Drawing from the science of Forensic Anthropology, the first in history to investigate human rights violations, witness the investigation of a crime that slowly reveals Alicia's identity – a woman who dared to resist.

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