Reclaiming Vietnam

Kim Chinh has mastered the art of storytelling in her new one-woman show Reclaiming Vietnam. Through her eloquent dialogue she narrates how her travels to Vietnam, in order to reclaim an identity she had rejected most of her life, awakened memories she had long ago tried to forget. Her story moves between her present day attempt to discover and find her identity in Vietnam, with flashbacks of her trying to overcome a traumatic experience in her past. 

This is a raw piece which leaves you with a mixture of emotions.

Through the account of her experiences, we see how each ordeal she has faced has not only given her courage to speak the truth and be more open about herself but has also allowed her to reclaim an identity she has lost, meaning that she now feels open and free.

One of the highlights of the performance is Kim’s vivid description of riding a motorbike through the streets of Vietnam. She has the knack of being able to transport you into the heart of this country, feeling that you are travelling on this journey with her. This causes her later revelations to become a lot more harrowing and moving as we become invested in her story. Complementing this dialogue are her movements which are simple and understated, but this subtlety is what makes this show such a treat: they keep you captivated and on the edge of your seat, entangling you in her story.

This is a raw piece which leaves you with a mixture of emotions as she freely opens herself up to the audience, exposing who she is in order to help claim her own identity. Through her mannerisms and calm collected voice, she leaves clichés behind, openly explaining who she is and how she has overcome traumatic experiences. This is a lifting piece which on the one hand helps you to understand and relate to the difficulties someone of a minority ethnic background has growing up in a white country like America – and on the other, shows how people can overcome their past and feel free for the future and its possibilities.  

Reviews by Emily Blackwell

Assembly at Murrayfield Ice Rink

Vertical Influences

★★★★
C venues - C

17

★★★
Greenside @ Nicolson Square

Bing Bang Bong

★★★
C venues - C nova

Womenswear

★★★
C venues - C nova

Picasso Stole the Mona Lisa

★★
The Famous Spiegeltent

Shakespeare in the Garden: Cheer Up, Hamlet

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

A young woman arrives in the homeland of her father. Vietnam represents a part of her identity she has rejected for most of her life, wishing to be seen as an American (like her Caucasian mother) and not Vietnamese. A spontaneous moonlight ride on a motorbike ends in a crash and old memories surface. The play alternates between her present day search for identity in Vietnam and flashbacks to her attempts to confront her personal history. Each experience strengthens her resolve to say the truth and in the process, reclaim what was lost.

Most Popular See More

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Anything Goes

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets