People

The premise of this show seems slightly crazy: writer and director David Levin wrote a series of poems that were then sent out to nine different composers across the world, and then brought together into this one musical revue. Surprisingly, this curious concept actually works remarkably well and I was amazed at how easily the songs segued from one to another, almost as if they had all been penned by the same composer.The songs are linked through the theme of love, and the majority are winners. I particularly enjoyed the sweeping melodies and chamber aspects to the pieces by Julian Wagstaff, Nigel Osborne and Georgios Athanasopoulos, but the music is consistently strong throughout. However, a musical revue is notoriously difficult to get right, particularly when such a variety of styles is involved. I am not completely convinced that the running order is correct yet; no real pulse throbbed through the piece and the second half felt considerably stronger than the first. There is also a distinct lack of an opening and closing number; it opens on a bit of a damp squib and then closes without any real sense of climax. Nevertheless, the filling in between is more than substantial, with an outstanding cast giving their all.The delightful trio of Cassidy Janson, Lindsey Danvers and Steven Wren are quite superb throughout. Their voices are pure and beautiful, and their acting is second to none. This is crucial to the success of the piece; the majority of the songs have a very simple staging yet the richness of characterisation and expressiveness carries the songs through.Janson's eyes brim with emotion throughout, bubbling with the untold back-stories of the characters and she effortlessly steals the audience's hearts. Wren displays a lovely stage presence, full of warmth yet with a beautiful tender side revealed near the end. Danvers emanates a command of the stage at all times, either whilst observing the others singing or when delivering the superb No More with utter truth and emotion. As a trio they are enchanting. The material, for the most part, matches up to their skill but as an entire piece needs a little work before it becomes entirely successful. Yet in the intimate atmosphere with lush voices surrounding me, I didn't mind a bit.

Reviews by Damian Sandys

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

'Love, the greatest scene of all, happens when it happens ... music tells all'. A revue for three singers by David Levin. Composers: Nigel Osborne, Giorgios Athanasopoulos, Sally Beamish, Alfredo Caponnetto, Alan Gilliand, Rick Wentworth, Cheryl Taylor, Kostas Rekleitis, Julian Wagstaff.

Most Popular See More

The Lion King

From £45.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Heathers The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Life of Pi

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £29.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets