Paul McCaffrey: Saying Something Stupid

Paul McCaffrey can very much be categorised as an observational comedian. This in itself is not necessarily a problem but considering that comics of this ilk have become, in the last decade, as ubiquitous as Simon Cowell and happy-slapping results in the unavoidable fact that it is an extremely competitive environment. What makes it even more difficult is that observational comedians aim to derive humour out of everyday phenomena that, crucially, are common to almost everyone. In this way, so that they can strike a chord with a large audience, there isn’t actually a huge amount of material that these great masses of observational comedians can utilise. They all try their hand at similar topics and the cream tends to rise to the top.As I say, McCaffrey throws his hat into this ring. We hear musings on online banking, telesales and other familiar topics. Furthermore, he engages in predictable patter with the audience about jobs and where they come from et cetera on top of the obligatory ridiculing of his own appearance. These assessments and appraisals of the world we live in are often humourous but they are achingly run of the mill and can be seen performed just as well, and often better, on Dave repeats for the rest of recorded time. Indeed, McCaffrey (whose mannerisms make him seem like a poor man’s southern Jason Manford) does have some material that works particularly well and has a whiff of originality. His judgement on ‘when banter goes bad’ resonates but these moments are far too few and far between. In all, McCaffrey ticks the observational boxes but these jokes simply don’t shake my sense that he merely cuts the figure of a McIntyre tribute act.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Hotly anticipated, hilarious debut solo show from award-winning stand-up comedian. ’He has charm, charisma and success written all over him’ (Evening Standard). ‘Likeable, animated, fluid with a first rate sense of timing’ (Chortle.co.uk).

Most Popular See More

Frozen the Musical

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Grease the Musical

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets