How to avoid a parking ticket: knowledge that doubtlessly appeals to the countless car-owners Fringe-wide who have been plastered by the yellow tickets of bureaucracy. This one-woman show incorporates music, dance, projection, video, and a sprinkling of audience participation to describe her true story – how she successfully dodged the fiscal sting of not one but several parking tickets and traffic fines, obtained on multiple occasions in and around her home in London.The audience was small on my visit, to a degree that would be disheartening and detrimental to many shows at the Festival. However this only served to submerse us more in her story – we were engaged throughout via direct eye contact and the occasional improvised quip or cheeky wink. All credit must be given to her zest for storytelling – the plot is unravelled with passion and, predominantly, fun; both wonderfully infectious.I did, however, struggle somewhat with the intricacies of the tale – we are hurled between Roman law definitions, descriptions of her vehicular penalties, and sing-song exposition; leaving a feeling, perhaps understandably, of the fact that the performer was keen to continuously spice the variety of the techniques used to deliver her narrative. Thus the songs and dances were at times a touch uncomfortable and the baton twirling perhaps unnecessary – though nonetheless fun; the presiding theme of the show. I learnt some interesting facts about name capitalisation and, were I to study The Letter provided in the programme in more detail, I may even learn how to evade all future parking tickets. Bring your cars, park on double yellow lines, and go learn the same.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

It started with several parking tickets, then the discovery of a hole we could all loop through. A true story down the rabbit hole into rebellion and freedom where lawfully not paying parking tickets is just the beginning.

Most Popular See More

Wicked

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £12.00

More Info

Find Tickets