One Night Stand

The plot of One Night Stand is, unsurprisingly, the repercussions of a drunken work night out for two colleagues who wake up in the same bed. Still wearing the clothes from the night before, Alice and Brian debate the circumstances they find themselves in and the potential outcomes of their relationship. Alice is the over-emotional bunny-boiler who believed this was the start to something beautiful, whilst Brian is desperate to get her out of his bed and forget the whole affair. His seemingly extreme anxiety becomes clear as other characters appear, adding to the stickiness of the situation.

What begins as a potentially amateurish production - the opening scene somewhat overdoes the clichés - soon becomes a brilliantly quick-witted comedy. The twists and turns of the plot wind up in a cleverly organised resolution, with plenty of punch-lines along the way. The only disappointment was the treatment of Alice, the stereotypically over-emotional female, who was unfairly used as a scapegoat to tie the ends neatly together. With such an endearing character, it seemed a bit lazy to place all the responsibility on her shoulders in order to reach a conclusion, even if she was a bit of a ‘psycho’.

Although some of the acting felt a little melodramatic,the overall performance was enjoyable, with well developed characters and skilfully delivered punch-lines. Despite the farcical elements, the convincing relationships between characters allowed the scenario to resonate with the audience, who will definitely avoid dipping their pen in the company ink in the future.

Reviews by Katherine Burr

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

The morning after the night before, two colleagues deal with the repercussions of an alcohol-fuelled night of passion. A farcical, quick-witted comedy about love, lust, commitment, crossed wires and a glittery men's thong.

Most Popular See More

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets