Nora and Jim

Though history favours certain people and ends up silencing others, theatre can be a means of trying to give a voice to those whose perspectives have been lost. Nora and Jim does just that, imagining how Nora Barnacle, James Jocye’s partner, would reply to Jim’s letters.

An interesting reflection on misogyny and the people society idolises

The starting point for the show is the existence of a series of jealous and angry letters Jim wrote to Nora while he was in Dublin and she was waiting for him in Trieste. Jim and Nora eloped to continental Europe in 1904 after getting together in Dublin, but five years later, during a visit to Dublin, Jim heard rumours of Nora’s past infidelities, prompting the series of furious, self-pitying letters. There is no record of Nora’s responses to his letters, and so this production by the Liverpool Irish Literary Theatre imagines what they would be.

The play is therefore recreated as an epistolary exchange between the couple. The left-hand side of the stage is occupied by Jim’s Dublin writing desk and the right-hand side is Nora’s writing desk in Trieste, while in the middle is the bed the two share.

One consequence of the play is to reaffirm the idea that one should truly not have idols: James Joyce may be one of the greatest writers of all time, I love his works, but the Jim that writes to Nora is undeniably a self-centered, arrogant, sexist man: and so the age-old question of how much separation there must be between a writer and their work springs up again.

Nora’s responses, imagined with eloquence, intelligence and a hint of resignation, seem at times too self-aware and ideal to be realistic, as she cleverly points out all of Jim’s flaws. But they do well in imagining a more common, less pretentious manner of speaking for her, in contrast with Jim’s over-poetic tone. And even the high perceptiveness and intelligence in Nora’s letters can be forgiven for their lack of realism when one sees them as trying to vindicate Nora, and women in general, from Jim’s interpretation of them.

This is an important issue at stake in the whole play: the way women are immortalized and described through the lens of a male gaze and pen, and not through their own voices. The tragic thing is that by the end of the play, we all know whose voice has triumphed. This is shown brilliantly in Nora’s last monologue, which resembles in important ways the last segment of Ulysses, the only part written from a woman’s perspective. It is one of the most famous parts of the book, but it has also been criticised for its representation of women. In the end, Nora seems to say, Jim will represent me, in the way men so often write about women.

This well-acted play, though at times not quite engaging enough, is an interesting reflection on misogyny and the people society idolises.

Reviews by Melanie Erspamer

Gilded Balloon Teviot

Dear Home Office :Still Pending

★★★★
Greenside @ Infirmary Street

Nora and Jim

★★★
Greenside @ Infirmary Street

A Matter of Race

★★★
Summerhall

Locus Amoenus

★★★★
The Royal Scots Club

Richard III (A One-Woman Show)

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

In 1909 the Irish writer James Joyce returned temporarily from exile in Trieste to his home town of Dublin, where he heard tales of the infidelity of his beloved partner Nora Barnacle. The outraged letters Joyce sent Nora have been preserved, their pages oozing with a jealous rage that permeates all his subsequent writing. In the absence of any historical record this play imagines her response. The silent partner of a 'great man', Nora's experience reverberates throughout a century in which women have had to fight for recognition on a wide range of fronts: legal, emotional, cultural.

Most Popular See More

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Anything Goes

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Life of Pi

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets