Nomad

It’s hard to know how much to say about the content of Nomad, a physical theatre piece by Gözde Atalay, because disorientation was such a strong part of my experience. I’m just not sure exactly how much of that disorientation was intentional.

We are simply feeling what Ayşe feels – dislocation, frustration, and disorientation

Nomad has three distinct parts that intertwine only to a certain degree. Undoubtedly the heart of the show is Ayşe, a woman immigrating to Europe. Her experience becomes all of our experience as she approaches the audience for help with things that seem outside our control. The audience participation that runs throughout the show is deeply uncomfortable, but we are simply feeling what Ayşe feels – dislocation, frustration, and disorientation to what is going on around us.

I understand the intention of breaking up that story with others, but unfortunately the two other parts of the performance are so tonally distinct that I struggle to put them together into one show. One, a police officer bordering on clownish, opens the show in such a way that sends my expectations in a very different direction than the majority of what follows. While audience interaction remains key, the laughter this character elicits seems at odds with the earnestness required by the rest of the show.

The third piece, a movement sequence centering around huge sheets of brown paper, is as compelling as dance, but again is difficult to relate back to Ayşe or the police officer, and takes us to a place of suspended disbelief and un-reality at odds with Ayşe’s groundedness.

Nomad, while affecting, leaves me reeling for reasons that seem both intentional and unintentional. I spend much of the performance – and much time after it – trying to make sense of what I am seeing and trying to understand what is happening. If that sounds like your idea of a good time, Nomad might be for you.

Visit Show Website

Reviews by Alex Bailey Dillon

Assembly @ Dance Base

Habitat

★★★★★
Underbelly’s Circus Hub on the Meadows

Brave Space

★★★★★
Summerhall

Nomad

★★★
Underbelly’s Circus Hub on the Meadows

Aloft Presents Sanctuary

★★★★
House of Oz

Common Dissonance

★★★★
Gilded Balloon Teviot

A Shark Ate My Penis: A History of Boys Like Me

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Nomad is a funny and heartfelt physical theatre performance centred in the experiences of Ayse, a Turkish female immigrant in Europe. A biographical theatre piece based on Gözde Atalay’s own journey as an immigrant in Europe. This performance is inspired by migrants' lived experience of paperwork, clerks and survival in a foreign country (finding work, learning a language...). Whether work, marriage or refuge is the reason for migration, the period of waiting administrative limbo – which can last years – the bureaucratic encounters that become the shared experience of all migrants.

Most Popular See More

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £35.00

More Info

Find Tickets