No Place Like Home

Watching No Place Like Home was an experience unlike any other I’ve had so far at the Fringe. A show that fuses spoken word, projections, music and dance, it depicts the story of two men on a night out in a gay club. On the surface they're both very different, but the story brings out the similarities in them that unite them as victims to a different narrative, this one written by society.

Deeply emotional and visually stunning, there are certainly many moments from this production that will stay with me for a very long time

The complexity of Roberts’ performance which encapsulated the playful, yet at times brutal tones of the language which only continued to grow throughout. I was floored by the true craftsmanship that went into the visual composition binding projection and shadow with the on-stage choreographed movement, and I commend the bravery and skill that it takes to pull off a performance of that level on a completely bare stage with the only prop being a hat!

I feel as though, on the surface it doesn’t resemble what you may expect from a five-star show, however, as someone who normally always has something to criticise about the performances I watch (no matter how trivial), I must confess there was nothing about this production that I could justifiably argue against. I believe, in part, this may be because the style of the show, something I am unable to pin down to one word, meant that any of the usual critiques I would make were fully justified in relation to the conceptual design and genre of this unique experience. It felt almost as if you were watching a video or a film, but simultaneously aware of the fact that you were sitting in a theatre, with the performer there in front of you.

This style of performance may not be everybody’s cup of tea, but no mater your personal preferences, the quality of writing, performance, and design in No Place Like Home must be recognised. Deeply emotional and visually stunning, there are certainly many moments from this production that will stay with me for a very long time.

Visit Show Website

Reviews by Sophie Burton

Pleasance Dome

No Place Like Home

★★★★★
Assembly Rooms

Love Loss & Chianti

★★★
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Bad Teacher

★★★
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Godot is a Woman

★★★★
Curve Theatre

Billy Elliot

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Winner of Les Enfants Terribles Award 2022. On a night out in a gay bar, Connor meets Rob. One's a newcomer, the other has been on the scene far too long. But when a kiss leads to a brutal attack – who's the victim and who's the perpetrator? Fusing spoken word, music, dance and video art, No Place Like Home is a tragic odyssey into gay club culture and the places we can call home. Get ready to laugh, cry and dance with somebody who loves you.

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