Nick Revell: Feminist Porno Jihadi

No one rants quite like Nick Revell. Once he’s found a topic to get his teeth stuck into, whether that’s ISIS, the Royal family or middle class consumption, he barely draws breath for ten minutes as a barrage of rage, wit and satire comes hurtling towards you at break neck speed.

As his relative calmness fades along with reality, Revell ditches his anecdotes for fictionalised scenarios in which he can develop his satire.

Yet his belligerent fury is not constant throughout the show. He sets it up beautiful with what he describes as 'preamble', giving amusing anecdotes about his mother and the worrying time when his family ran out of za’taar. He’s given up on political satire he explains; it’s too much work to be constantly up to date with current affairs and frankly he can’t be bothered.

Don’t be deceived; while doing a seamlessly harmless skit on daytime television, he makes a side gag about Syrian migrants and suddenly a can of worms is not just opened but ejected into the stratosphere, and normal business is resumed. It’s kind of terrifying to see a man’s inner fury materialise in such an explosive manner, but it’s also breathtaking.

As his relative calmness fades along with reality, Revell ditches his anecdotes for fictionalised scenarios in which he can develop his satire. From a meeting of world powers to decide the true name of ISIS to Revell’s impression of Jesus, he not only uses his imagination to make his satire comedic, but also to strengthen his point of view. By placing several taboo subjects in fictitious realms, Revell is able to satirise them with such ease that you often forget why they were controversial in the first place.

Of course one has wonder to what extent your political views get in the way of enjoying Revell’s set. I suspect that if you’re an enthusiastic Tory or staunch royalist, sections of the show may prove to be uncomfortable. However if you can put your politics to one side and are looking for some first-class, experienced satire, this is your show. 

Reviews by Will Roberts

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Returning to The Stand after last year’s Closet Optimist, Perrier Award nominee and Fringe veteran Nick Revell continues to mix satirical comedy with surreal storytelling, in a show which promises to be his finest to date. ‘An impressive, hefty hour of political comedy’ (LondonIsFunny.com). ‘An expert in delivering thought-provoking, political satire, combined with a strong delivery and great stage presence’ (Edinburgh Festivals Magazine). ‘A master at work’ (Bruce Dessau). ‘Consistently excellent’ (Guardian).