News Junkie

This piece from Japan seeks to present a slice of life. It states on its flyer that it doesn’t show “taiko, kimono, samurai, sushi, geisha or kabuki”. Instead, it offers a stripped-back solo performance in an intimate venue about a man and the woman he loves.

The show calls for a writing consultant.

Yuuya Ishizone is an excellent performer and has a good emotional range in this piece. Unfortunately, the script is underdeveloped and it takes a few scenes for the story to emerge, but even then many of the following scenes fail to progress. The piece sets into a predictable rhythm of the character reading the news and then calling his old school friend Jennifer, who has returned to Japan as a journalist to cover the aftermath of the earthquake.

It’s clear from the beginning that he yearns for Jenny, but it takes a while for him to try and win her. Beginning at first with social proprieties, he repeatedly suggests they meet up, but she’s always too busy. Meanwhile, he becomes increasingly despondent in his job as an English teacher, particularly after students tell him his English isn’t good. What’s not clear is the purpose of the news reading scenes – to begin with, we’re unsure if the addition of his reading glasses is intended to signify a different character. This does become clear later on, although I still wonder at the choice of the news pieces included. Other than a news piece on the earthquake, the significance of the stories is unclear.

Ishizone wrote, directed and performs News Junkie. This triple threat approach is common in the Fringe, although it’s usually ill advised. Many solo performances would benefit from outside eyes, usually with the addition of a director. In this case, the show calls for a writing consultant. The problem here is the script, which needs reshaping and some refining for clarity.

Reviews by Emma Gibson

theSpace @ Venue45

Love and Information by Caryl Churchill

★★★★
C venues - C nova

Cartography

★★★
theSpace on the Mile

The Beanfield

★★★★
Pleasance Dome

The Hampstead Murder Mystery!

★★★★
theSpace on the Mile

Marching for Necie

★★
Paradise in The Vault

Women of the Mourning Fields

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

New piece from Japan. The story is about a man reflecting on life through the news. This story can be simply romance, comedy and also tragedy, which touches your feelings and delivers you some tenderness. You get bread from a bakery and fish from a fishmonger, the way human feelings are created for us through news.

Most Popular See More

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £29.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets