Nathan Caton: Can't Tell Me Nothin'

Despite being Nathan Caton's first solo show at the Edinburgh Fringe, he talks with such authority and ease that you could easily mistake him for a Fringe veteran. Apart from an ill-judged and over-long introductory voiceover, the show is full to the brim with comic talent and a flair for working the crowd. It is easy to see why he has previously won the Chortle Student Comic Award and had his debut comedy pilot The Nathan Caton Show aired on Paramount Television. The only sign of nerves was a sense of randomly shuffling around the stage, yet his voice remained confident and authoritive throughout; I am sure this will sort itself out with a few more performances under his belt.Caton's stand-up routine has an impressive structure to it, lending a particular edge of clarity to the piece. He has certain hooks that he keeps coming back to – graduating, finding a job, his parents and brother – and this helps bind everything together into a unified form. The topics lead naturally into each other, helped by both his good sense of pace and the intimacy of the venue. The close proximity of the seats creates more of a conversational feel between Caton and the audience, who were lapping it all up on this occasion.Without spoiling any of his routine, sections on being ginger, girls wearing their boyfriends' t-shirts and the similarities between paedophiles and diabetics brought the biggest laughs, and had me chuckling well after the show. Some of the gags brought a few gasps from certain members of the audience but, to his credit, Caton managed to reel them back in within the same joke to actually laugh even louder and the eventual (and even filthier) pay off. Caton also includes impressions of some of the people he mentions, including his grandmother, providing some distinct visual humour in addition to his constant stream of verbal gags. Indeed, at the performance I watched virtually every sentence achieved a laugh somewhere, and absolutely nothing bombed, largely due to some fantastic payoffs at the end of sections; no mean feat for a first Fringe show.This may have been Caton's first solo Fringe show but I have no doubts that it will not be his last. Since watching the show I have heard his name mentioned by several people wanting to see his show. I advise you to book now.

Reviews by Damian Sandys

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Chortle Comedy Award winner. Nathan turned down a traditional career for stand-up and his mum's not happy. He graduated, but his family is still giving him a lecture. 'Slick performer ... powerhouse performance' (Chortle.co.uk).

Most Popular See More

The Lion King

From £42.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets