Myra's Story

A ninety-minute monologue about a homeless person? Embrace it. Myra’s Story deserves to be the talk of the Fringe.

Myra’s Story deserves to be the talk of the Fringe.

Irish playwright Brian Foster walked past a homeless alcoholic begging in the street and turned his head away, pretending not to see or hear her. Unlike the rest of us, who have done just that so many times, he turned his feeling of guilt into what has turned out to be a spectacularly successful play full of humour and pathos about a middle-aged woman he named Myra McLaughlin, who was in that very situation.

The play opens on a bitterly cold December’s day in the Irish capital. Myra is funny, feisty, and foul-mouthed as she begs for her drink money from passers-by. She wasn’t always on the street. Like every human being, she had a life that brought her to where she is today. She was in love, she was married, she had a child, but for her it all went wrong, as it could for anyone, but for most it doesn’t.

Bringing Foster’s work to life is the accomplished Dublin actor Fíonna Hewitt-Twamley. As she unfolds Myra’s tragic tale, she vividly creates the characters who moulded her life, with a range of voices and physicality that gives them profound credibility. They are at times amusing, idiosyncratic, nasty, sympathetic, vengeful and always vulnerable. They are the real people who witnessed her demise and were unable to prevent it. Hewitt-Twamley captures them as vivid exemplars of humanity in a less-than-ideal world.

Brian Foster has said, “I’m sure the reason for the play’s success is the mix of hilarity and heartbreak. Everyone...can relate to the damaged character they see up on stage. My play allows them to look into Myra’s face. To stand in her grubby shoes. Smell her stale odours. Hear her voice”. Performing to a full house at the Spiegeltent Palais Du Variete, as the lights dimmed on Myra's final moments we rose to give a standing ovation to his outstanding play and the stunning performance from Hewitt-Twamley who has brought it to life. This is not to be missed.

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Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

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The Blurb

Myra, a middle-aged, homeless Dublin street drinker, is feisty, funny and tragic. Desperate for her first drink of the day, she begs from the passing city centre throngs. Between begging, she relives her back story. Playing all the characters and acting out all the incredible events that have led her to this pitiful existence, Myra takes us on a swirling, searing, at times hilarious, but ultimately heart-breaking journey. Winner of Best Tragedy award, United Solo Festival (New York, 2016). You'll laugh with Myra... you'll cry with Myra... what you'll never do, is forget her.

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