Morag and Keats

The hilariously subtitled ‘play noir’ indeed followed a traditional film noir plot of murder, sleuthing and sex, but with a fun, silly modern spin on it. Join Inspector Keats as he hunts down the infamous crime lord Scalarsi, of course only to be met with trails, tribulations and a whole host of characters along the way. In customary film noir tradition, expect the unexpected in an absurd world where appearances are both deceptive and indeed, seductive.

The script was something short of genius. It was tight, sharp and it definitely, as they say, ‘went there’. It satirised the film noir genre perfectly and went even further in terms of darkness. The best written part was the narrator, voiced by the Mighty Boosh’s Rich Fulcher. The part wonderfully and hilariously pointed out all the clichés and tropes of film noir. The only slight quibble with the script was that most of the scenes (and there were lots of them) finished with a joke, which often made the endings feel rather abrupt. Apart from this, the production cannot be faulted.

The cast were all excellent and committed to their stock film noir roles entirely. Special commendations however must go to Alice Kirk as Morag, who absolutely oozed charm, sex appeal and a flawless Southern accent to boot. It was also directed well and had a very professional feel to it, which was surprising coming from such a young cast.

The audience was in stitches throughout and it was a thoroughly enjoyable show. It’s great to witness this new breed of thriller-drama: keep them coming please!

Since you’re here…

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Performances

The Blurb

A beautiful dame, an evil crime lord, a confused chief. Professionally widowed Detective Keats investigates the murder of his partner. A new play noir from the team behind Be Fruitful and Multiply: 'Perfect, hilarious' (Stage). www.1945productions.com

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