Moon

Given that I am Welsh and probably genetically hardwired to love close-harmony singing, I do not normally go out of my way to find it. However, on this occasion I made my way with my children (BBR11 and BBR8) to the Symposium Hall. As a venue, it is smart and has comfortable seats in the lecture theatre, each having a clear view of the stage and being well-placed for the acoustics. Australian Voices is a mixed choir of young people whose artistic director Gordon Hamilton wrote the music for Moon, while the text came from the pen of Australian writer Venero Armanno.

This darkly romantic love story between Diana, goddess of the moon, and Sam, a dying boy seeking solace on the internet seems melancholy and far-fetched at first, but the thirteen voices of the ensemble lifted the theme and conveyed emotion, as well as being used instrumentally. Movement also came into play during the performance and this helped with the essence of the ‘epic premise’. However, Sam’s foray into cyber-sex and his love-making with Diana whilst beautifully expressed, took the suitability out of the stated ‘universal’. It was a bit grunty in places. BBR11 was not phased but BBR8 squirmed, being eight. Mind you, he didn’t understand any of it and didn’t like the singing either.

About midway through, I heard throat-singing amid the voices. Supremely difficult, this technique raised the piece into the ethereal and it was impossible to tell from whose throat this wonderful sound emanated. The text is sparse and strange: Diana cries ‘tears of pearls’ and sends moonbeams to find Sam whose face is ‘ghost-lit by a computer screen’. A strange mix of ancient and modern, a reaching out to cross all divisions - between human and god, cosmic and earthbound, mythical, virtual and real.

The performance quite literally blew me away, through the stratosphere and out into the cormos, where I floated around for an hour or so before drifting back to Earth. Even BBR11 said he thought it was amazing. Moon is strange, ethereal and supremely beautiful. The subtle power of the voices transcends the everyday, and we all need a bit of that sometimes, don’t we?

Reviews by Sarah McIntosh

Edinburgh Playhouse

Funny Girl

★★★★
Festival Theatre Edinburgh

Buddy – The Buddy Holly Story

★★★★
King's Theatre

TOM, the Musical

★★★★
Festival Theatre Edinburgh

James III: The True Mirror

★★★★
Festival Theatre Edinburgh

James II: Day of the Innocents

★★★
Festival Theatre Edinburgh

James I: The Key Will Keep The Lock

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

What happens when the moon falls in love with a dying boy? This uplifting story features the sublime sounds of The Australian Voices... an a cappella choral-theatre work for 20 singers including movement, costumes, lighting and projections. www.theaustralianvoices.com.

Most Popular See More

The Lion King

From £42.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets