Milk Presents: Self Service

Suitably advertised as a punk-style voyage, this is a raucous hour of cabaret, humour and profound insights into the connotations of the word ‘queer’. The company consists of Adam Robertson, Lucy Doherty and Ruby Glaskin and they perform a brave, edgy performance that will provide ample food for thought for any audience member, regardless of gender or sexuality.

It’s a messy show for sure - very rough around the edges - but therein lies in Milk’s appeal.

The show consists of a number of vignettes, starting off quite light and amusing, with two members of the audience pulled up onstage to perform as hosts throughout the show. The company provides an enjoyably daft beginning that hints at the darker aspects to come. With some excellent musical numbers and amusing use of mime and projections, the three hosts tease us with some deliciously camp routines, aided with the use of live music and their fabulously gaudy outfits (all three of them are kitted out in gold leggings and blonde wigs).

There’s a juxtaposition within the show however as the team begin to look into more serious pressures such as homophobia and sexism. It’s quite a telling, jarring effect when a movement sequence appears representing the homophobic assaults in Russia. Equally dark are the sexist jokes, told by the female members of the group about women, that provide an awkward amount of shocked laughter at the punch lines.

It’s a messy show for sure - very rough around the edges - but therein lies in Milk’s appeal. This isn’t polished but far the better for it. Although some of the politics may be laid on a little too hard, there’s so much to enjoy within this show that it’s forgivable. The cast are exceptionally good throughout and whilst any given vignette may be laid on a bit too thick, there’s no denying the angry passion that’s gone into the production. Self Service is a profound, liberating experience and a whole lot of gloriously camp and tacky fun. 

Reviews by Stewart McLaren

Online at www.DavidLeddy.com (with Traverse Theatre)

City Of the Blind

★★★
Northern Stage at King's Hall

Milk Presents: Self Service

★★★★
Scottish Storytelling Centre

Haggis Haggis Haggis

★★★
Institut français d'Ecosse

Antiquithon

★★★★
Traverse Theatre

RIVERRUN

★★

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Performances

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The Blurb

A punk-style queer voyage through what normal really means, featuring original live music, handcrafted animation and tacky politics. Total Theatre Award nominees present their latest deliciously decadent, raucously low-fi, toe-tapping, gender-bending 'cabaret of the most welcoming kind' (BritishTheatreGuide.info). This show spans decades of popular culture, political upheaval and quaint normalness. It episodically and sporadically attempts to define the indefinable. Ann Widdecombe, Madonna and the Beatnik generation are thrust together in a theatrical feat that wears high-heels a size too small and sunglasses a size too big. 'Play School meets Weimar Cabaret' (Guardian). Photo by Holly Revell.

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